Maternity Leave Laws — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Business Management Daily
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Maternity Leave Laws

Need a sample maternity leave policy? Information on pregnancy disability leave? We can help with the latest on topics like disability maternity leave.

Creating a legally compliant maternity leave policy is harder than ever. When you need assistance, trust Business Management Daily to help you deliver.

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Businesses must stay abreast of an alphabet soup of federal laws—ADA, ADEA, FMLA and so forth—each with its own requirements. Further complicating matters, most states have their own laws that override the federal requirements. To comply, you first must know which laws apply to your business.

Under the FMLA, employers with 50 or more employees within 75 miles of the company’s work site are required to provide FMLA leave to their employees. But even if you're a small employer, innocent mistakes could make the “50/75 rule” meaningless to you — and force you to provide FMLA leave. Learn how to avoid that trap.

New moms on average receive twice as much paid leave as new dads before and after the birth of a child.
When an employee shares the news of her pregnancy with her manager, it may bring on mixed emotions. While the supervisor may be happy for the employee, the realities of scheduling and productivity will weigh heavy on his or her mind.
Serving in the military and raising a family haven’t always been compatible, especially during times of international conflict and repeat deployments overseas.
The Supreme Court ruled on March 25 that a pregnant UPS employee who was denied a light-duty position is entitled to a new trial. The Court’s framework for pregnancy discrimination cases allows employees who show that an employer policy that creates a “significant burden” for pregnant employees violates the Preg­­nancy Dis­­crimi­­na­­tion Act.

HR Law 101: The Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA) of 1978 prohibits discrimination on the basis of "pregnancy, childbirth and related medical conditions." Employers can't deny a woman a job or a promotion merely because she's pregnant or has had an abortion ...

Do you have a place where an employee can pump breast milk? If you don’t have a spare room or want to dodge the renovation costs of creating such a room, there is an alternative: a movable breast-pumping pod known as the Mamava Lactation Station.

A Bethlehem Wawa convenience store violated the FLSA when it refused to provide an appropriate place for an employee to express breast milk, according to investigators with the U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division.
Q. An employee would like to use FMLA time to spend with her daughter after her grandchild is born later this year. There are no expected complications post-birth, but the new mom will need much assistance. Would this qualify for FMLA leave?
Sometimes, it may be appropriate to offer light-duty assignments to pregnant employees. However, there’s a right way and a wrong way to handle those accommodations.
More California employees will be eligible to take paid family leave starting July 1. That’s when grandparents, grandchildren, siblings and parents-in-law will be added to the list of relatives for whom caregiver leave is authorized.
The PDA outlaws treating pregnant women worse than employees who aren’t pregnant. However, it doesn’t require affirmative steps to help them deal with complications. Employers are complying with the law if they give pregnant women the same time off or temporary light work assignments they give other temporarily impaired workers.
When a formerly high-rated em­­ployee suddenly finds herself on the receiving end of a poor evaluation, she’s likely to look for a reason—such as her recent announcement that she is expecting a baby.
Ordinarily, if an employer can show it decided to terminate an employee before she announced her pregnancy, a pregnancy discrimination lawsuit won’t succeed. But employers that try to make a better case for termination by whipping up a new performance appraisal that emphasizes poor performance can wind up handing the employee an easy lawsuit victory.
Beginning Jan. 30, most ­employers with employees working in New York City will be required to provide reasonable accommodations for pregnant employees.
Here’s a simple message you can pass on to bosses dealing with pregnant employees: Tell them the only appropriate response is to offer the mother-to-be a congratulations when she announces her pregnancy.
Laredo-based Platinum PTS will pay a former employee $100,000 to settle charges it violated the Pregnancy Discrimination Act. According to her complaint, the former employee was fired after she asked for time off following a miscarriage.
Let's say someone requests a series of leave extensions for medical reasons. You approve them over several months until she’s used up all available accumulated leave—and then approve unpaid extensions in the hope she’ll return soon. At that point, you are free to ask if her doctor can provide a definite return date. If the answer is no, you can safely terminate her.
The EEOC is suing a Chick-fil-A res­­tau­­rant in Concord, alleging violations of the Pregnancy Discrimination Act that almost any savvy HR professional would have known to avoid.
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