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Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

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A look at the current state of LGBT anti-discrimination and employee rights and and what to expect to happen in the courts in 2019.
A look at the current state of LGBT anti-discrimination and employee rights and and what to expect to happen in the courts in 2019.
No matter how fair you have been, always assume an employee who has been disciplined will sue, alleging some form of discrimination. Be prepared!
It's never a good idea to diagnose or suspect your employees of a disability. If you suspect an employee may be disabled, keep it to yourself.
How to create a voluntary affirmative action policy that doesn't stray too far from certain employment laws.
The Department of Labor has issued an opinion letter confirming activities for which tipped workers need not be paid extra.
Employers must reasonably accommodate disabled workers so they can perform the essential functions of their jobs. But at what point does absenteeism make it impossible for the worker to perform the job?
Final statewide sexual harassment policy and training guidelines have finally been issued in New York, and the rules differ significantly in several important ways. Plus, more civil service employees now have job protection.
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement is ramping up its efforts to ensure everyone who works in the United States is authorized to do so. Audits of employers’ I-9 records are ICE’s primary compliance tool.
While a divided Congress should reduce the chances for big legislative action, it’s sure to mean one important thing for HR: more regulatory activity.
The National Labor Relations Board wants to revise the rule that determines if two employers can be considered joint employers for the purpose of deciding labor-management disputes.
Make sure to document a worker’s performance decline to protect your company if you fire the worker and he or she sues alleging discrimination.
There are a few workplace scenarios in which the nature of the job makes it more likely that sexual harassment may occur. But even then, once an employer knows harassment is happening, it has an obligation to stop it.
If a worker refuses to accept an offered accommodation, the employer is free to end the accommodations process—which may even mean the employee loses her job.
The Supreme Court’s decision in Janus v. AFSCME struck down as unconstitutional the Illinois fair share law and similar state laws, including New York’s. This decision could be devastating for New York public-sector unions.
The EEOC has filed a lawsuit against a Texas employer that requires all its employees to report every medication they take, both prescription and over-the-counter drugs.
The National Labor Relations Board last year overturned an established standard for determining if workplace rules comply with the National Labor Relations Act. Now the NLRB has issued a memorandum providing employer guidance.
The 8th Circuit Court of Appeals reaffirmed that former employees who are poor and struggling to represent themselves aren’t entitled to the help of an attorney at no charge.
Cosmetics giant Estée Lauder has agreed to pay $1,100,000 to men who the EEOC said were harmed by discriminatory parental leave policies.
Three questions about overtime pay in California.
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