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Remarkable Leadership with Kevin Eikenberry

Remarkable Leadership with Kevin Eikenberry

Kevin Eikenberry
Chief Potential Officer
The Kevin Eikenberry Group

Kevin Eikenberry is a world renowned leadership expert, a two-time bestselling author, speaker, consultant, trainer, coach, leader, learner, husband and father (not necessarily in that order). He is the Chief Potential Officer of The Kevin Eikenberry Group, a leadership and learning consulting company that has been helping organizations, teams and individuals reach their potential since 1993. Kevin’s specialties include leadership, teams and teamwork, organizational culture, facilitating change, organizational learning and more. He has worked with Fortune 500 companies, small firms, universities, government agencies, hospitals, and more. His client list includes the American Red Cross, A & W Canada, Chevron Phillips Chemical Company, John Deere, Purdue University, Sears Canada, Shell, Southwest Airlines, the U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Mint, Verizon and many more.

Kevin writes two email-based publications: Unleashing Your Remarkable Potential, a weekly publication read by more than 22,000 worldwide, to assist organizations and individuals in turning their potential into desired results; and Leadership Updates, sent several times each week. In addition, his Leadership and Learning Blog has been recognized on several occasions as one of the best leadership blogs in the world.

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Whatever your specific leadership role, I am confident you find yourself in the role of presenting to others – at least on occasion.  And if that is true, I’m guessing you would like to do it more effectively and more persuasively. These are good goals.  Yet too many people present just like everyone else; which of course, gives you the same results they got.

Project management training, advice and wise counsel can be found anywhere. Fair less is written about leading projects. This short article won’t put much of a dent in the balance of that writing — project management vs. project leadership, but it will illuminate five key lessons that I have learned from personal experience, as well as coaching and observing others.

Unless you are living under a rock (or don’t have a teenage daughter), you know that a selfie is a photo taken of yourself by yourself — likely with a cell phone camera. I’m going to ask you to take one right now.

We all work with other people. And most of you reading this are leading other people too. This makes the question I’m often asked very relevant: Yes, I have to work with them, but do I have to like them? The short answer is, no …

Many of us were taught as kids not to brag or boast. That is a fine lesson, but it is incomplete. And in the incompleteness, part of the wisdom gets lost. Here’s the problem. Bragging or boasting, when seen as a bad thing, points us toward being humble (which is also good), but also subtly steers us away from any outwards sign of being confident. But …

Ron Popeil is an American inventor and marketer most famous for his infomercial for the Showtime Rotisserie, where he told users to “set it and forget it.” His well-known phrase seems to have migrated from cooking chickens in his rotisserie to a common approach to goal setting. Let me explain …

There is tremendous joy and satisfaction that I gain from my work. I am doing the work I was put on earth to do and have the chance to lead a fantastic team doing the same things. And … sometimes … I shake my head …

We do work every day and it becomes routine. We have even gotten good at it, and not just from our own measures, but from feedback and results that tell us we are doing well. And because of that relative success and the habit and the comfort, we don’t see a need to move, change, grow or improve. But you are a leader, which means you must think differently, higher and see a picture that others don't see.

Stick and stones may break our bones, but for most of us, words can too — especially when questions are used as weapons. As leaders and good communicators we must think about as asking better questions, but there is more to great questions than the right words, timing and intonation. There is a caveat too …

Stick and stones may break our bones, but for most of us, words can too — especially when questions are used as weapons. As leaders and good communicators we must think about as asking better questions, but there is more to great questions than the right words, timing and intonation. There is a caveat too …

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