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Remarkable Leadership with Kevin Eikenberry

Remarkable Leadership with Kevin Eikenberry

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I’ve been writing a blog here off and on, and mostly off for a long time. While I write very regularly here, I have been remiss here. That is going to change. While there are plenty of explanations for being MIA here, none are excuses. So rather than providing either, I will talk about the […]

Project management training, advice and wise counsel can be found anywhere. Fair less is written about leading projects. This short article won’t put much of a dent in the balance of that writing — project management vs. project leadership, but it will illuminate five key lessons that I have learned from personal experience, as well as coaching and observing others.

Unless you are living under a rock (or don’t have a teenage daughter), you know that a selfie is a photo taken of yourself by yourself — likely with a cell phone camera. I’m going to ask you to take one right now.

We all work with other people. And most of you reading this are leading other people too. This makes the question I’m often asked very relevant: Yes, I have to work with them, but do I have to like them? The short answer is, no …

Many of us were taught as kids not to brag or boast. That is a fine lesson, but it is incomplete. And in the incompleteness, part of the wisdom gets lost. Here’s the problem. Bragging or boasting, when seen as a bad thing, points us toward being humble (which is also good), but also subtly steers us away from any outwards sign of being confident. But …

Ron Popeil is an American inventor and marketer most famous for his infomercial for the Showtime Rotisserie, where he told users to “set it and forget it.” His well-known phrase seems to have migrated from cooking chickens in his rotisserie to a common approach to goal setting. Let me explain …

There is tremendous joy and satisfaction that I gain from my work. I am doing the work I was put on earth to do and have the chance to lead a fantastic team doing the same things. And … sometimes … I shake my head …

We do work every day and it becomes routine. We have even gotten good at it, and not just from our own measures, but from feedback and results that tell us we are doing well. And because of that relative success and the habit and the comfort, we don’t see a need to move, change, grow or improve. But you are a leader, which means you must think differently, higher and see a picture that others don't see.

Stick and stones may break our bones, but for most of us, words can too — especially when questions are used as weapons. As leaders and good communicators we must think about as asking better questions, but there is more to great questions than the right words, timing and intonation. There is a caveat too …

Stick and stones may break our bones, but for most of us, words can too — especially when questions are used as weapons. As leaders and good communicators we must think about as asking better questions, but there is more to great questions than the right words, timing and intonation. There is a caveat too …

As leaders we have a responsibility for supporting, enabling and expecting our teams to improve their work processes. Because of that fact, today I want to share a trio of important ideas related to process improvement — all important, all worthy of the full space available, yet I determined that giving you a morsel of each was preferable to picking one.

While my message today is always relevant, as we get closer to the end of the year, there are more and more goal-setting conversations. While these conversations are important and necessary, I believe too much emphasis can be placed on goal setting. Not because setting goals isn’t important, but because too many people exert effort to set goals then feel like the job is done, which is like going to the starting line of a race, crouching down in the blocks and feeling like you don’t need to run the race because your work is already done.

Persuasion is not manipulation. If a connection between those words crosses your mind, it is time to eradicate it — and my goal in this short post is to help you do just that.

I often get asked by leaders of internal groups how they can create a Customer focus when their team has no direct connection or interaction with the paying Customer. I dealt with this as a Supervisor when I worked at Chevron many years ago, so my advice comes from my three-part combo experience: As a leader in the middle of an organization, as a former sales person in that same organization, and now as a business owner and consultant for 23 years. Given that perspective, here is my three part answer to the question.

I often say that the feedback you give says as much about you as it does the person you are giving it to, and when I do people look at me funny. After all, the feedback I give you is about something you did, it isn’t about me at all, is it? Not so fast, my friend.

I often say that the feedback you give says as much about you as it does the person you are giving it to, and when I do people look at me funny. After all, the feedback I give you is about something you did, it isn’t about me at all, is it? Not so fast, my friend.

As a leader, you are a part of at least two teams — the team you lead and your team of peers. Often leaders don’t focus enough of their energy and time on one or the other of those teams, to everyone’s detriment. Today, I want to talk about how to build relationships with your peer team — especially if you are new, and they aren’t.

Dialogue is a fabulous communication tool. It allows for clarity of understanding, closure and complete communication. When you think about it that way, you’d think — why wouldn’t I want to use it?

Because you are reading these words, I am confident you have an achievement mindset — you are a believer in ongoing learning and development for yourself and those you lead. This belief is a big part of the answer to your question, but let me start someplace else. Because of how you see the world, it might be hard for you to understand why others might not be excited or looking forward to a training or learning experience. Let me see if I can give you some perspective, as well as some action steps.

The title of this post is a great question and the answer is … It depends. Actually, there are, I believe, two answers that may seem in disagreement at first, but I hope they will be clearer to you in the time it takes you to read this short post.

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