Compensation and Benefits
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Compensation and Benefits

Compensation and benefits topics – whether it’s minimum wage, workers’ compensation laws, or employee pay – if properly handled, can help you retain workers and recruit new ones.

Use our advice to craft independent contractor agreements that keep independent contractors – and your bosses – happy.

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An increasing number of employers are giving money and other incentives to workers to encourage them to fund their emergency savings accounts, reduce their debt and attend financial education classes.
Employers that featured five or more wellness best practices had average turnover of 18%, compared to 29% for employers that had implemented two or fewer.
When an employee is injured on the job, what you do—and when you do it—can determine not only how quickly the employee will return to work but also whether he or she will return at all.
As telework’s popularity grows, so do legal concerns for employers. To lower your risks, devise a telecommuting policy that protects you on these fronts.
Thirty-seven percent of workers expect to work past age 70, an increase from 30% two years ago.

Be sure employees know your rules for leaving work early. That way, an employee who violates the rules will have committed willful misconduct, disqualifying him from receiving unemployment compensation benefits.

How much do your workers really understand about their employee benefits? A new study says U.S. employees truly understand less than they (or you) would think.
Union funding to organize fast-food employees was cut in half last year, according to a new study by the conservative Center for Union Facts.
New Jersey appears to be on the brink of becoming the 10th state to enact a mandatory paid sick leave law.
Two-thirds of millennials have absolutely no retirement savings according to a new report by the nonprofit National Institute on Retirement Security.
Now that millennials have begun to outnumber baby boomers and Gen Xers in the workplace, they’re changing the way employees use health care, according to new research by the Employee Benefit Research Institute.
Some employers will soon be able to avoid the hefty penalties and double damages that usually result when the government discovers violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act.

A worker who was seriously injured while driving to mandatory training is eligible for workers’ compensation.

A panel of the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals on March 15 struck down the so-called fiduciary rule, an Obama-era regulation that required retirement plan advisors to always act in clients' best interests instead of recommending investments that generated broker commissions.

In a recent unemployment compensation benefit decision, the Pennsylvania Commonwealth Court has concluded that participating in the “gig-economy” doesn’t necessarily constitute self-employment.

Millennial employees grew used to taking “just for now” jobs with little hope of long-term stability. Their experience should inform your benefits strategy.

Senate legislation introduced March 8 would help employees save more for retirement and encourage employers to offer retirement benefits.

More employers added these benefits offerings than any others between 2016 and 2017.

A federal court has vacated a portion of the EEOC’s wellness program regulations, effective Jan. 1, 2019.

Under the disability discrimination provisions of California’s Fair Employment and Housing Act, employers are required to offer extended leave as a reasonable accommodation for disabled employees—as long as the employee provides an estimated return date.

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