20 professional words to use to elevate your writing

professional words 300x300Whether you’re writing an email, proposal, report, or presentation, you want to put your best foot, or in this case, your best words forward. Part of writing more professionally is simply upgrading your word choices.

There are certain words in the English language that sound more casual and others that give a more powerful impression. When you use power words in your writing, you can set yourself apart with more professional communication.

Here are 20 words or phrases you can use to make your writing sound more professional.

Provide

Instead of saying give, you can use the word provide.

For example…

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Don’t say: I will give you a copy of the data from last quarter’s report

Instead say: I will provide you with the data from last quarter’s report.

Receive

Instead of saying get, you can use the word receive.

For example…

Don’t say: Did you get the package I sent via the pony last week?

Instead say: Did you receive the package I sent via the pony last week?

Attend

Instead of saying come, you can use the word attend.

For example…

Don’t say: I’m unable to come to Tuesday’s professional development session.

Instead say: I’m unable to attend Tuesday’s professional development session.

Assist

Instead of saying help, you can use the word assist.

For example…

Don’t say: Do you need me to help you with the upcoming project?

Instead say: Do you need me to assist you with the upcoming project?

Discuss

Instead of saying talk, you can use the word discuss.

For example…

Don’t say: Let’s schedule a time to talk about the issue.

Instead say: Let’s schedule a time to discuss the issue.

Certainly

Instead of saying yes, you can use the word certainly.

For example…

Don’t say: Yes, I agree with that idea.

Instead say: Certainly, I agree with that idea.

Modify

Instead of saying change, you can use the word modify.

For example…

Don’t say: We need to change the time of next week’s meeting.

Instead say: We need to modify the time of next week’s meeting.

In Conclusion

Instead of saying finally, you can use the phrase in conclusion.

For example…

Don’t say: Finally, keep in mind that I will be out of the office next week.

Instead say: In conclusion, keep in mind that I will be out of the office next week.

However

Instead of saying but, you can use the word however.

For example…

Don’t say: That’s a great idea in my opinion, but upper management must sign off.

Instead say: That’s a great idea in my opinion, however, upper management must sign off.

Moreover or furthermore

Instead of saying also, you can use the words moreover or furthermore.

For example…

Don’t say: Also, I found the report to include a compelling argument for plan B.

Instead say: Moreover, I found the report to include a compelling argument for plan B.

Or say: Furthermore, I found the report to include a compelling argument for Plan B.

Ramifications

Instead of saying consequences, you can use the word ramifications.

For example…

Don’t say: The consequences can be severe for all stakeholders if this falls through.

Instead say: The ramifications can be severe for all stakeholders if this falls through.

Consensus

For example…

Instead of saying opinion, you can use the word consensus.

Don’t say: We are seeking the opinion of all involved in the new project.

Instead say: We are seeking the consensus of all involved in the new project.

For instance

Instead of saying like, you can use the phrase for instance.

For example…

Don’t say: I want you to incorporate video in the presentation —like a 5 minute summary of the latest report for ease of understanding.

Instead say: I want you to incorporate video in the presentation. For instance, a 5 minute summary of the latest report for ease of understanding would work.

Straightforward

Instead of saying easy, you can say straightforward.

For example…

Don’t say: The directions for the next step are easy.

Instead say: The directions for the next step are straightforward.

Perspective

Instead of saying opinion, you can say perspective.

For example…

Don’t say: We are seeking the opinion of our accounting team before moving forward.

Instead say: We are seeking the perspective of our accounting team before moving forward.

Provided that

Instead of saying as long as, you can use the phrase provided that.

For example…

Don’t say: I am open to that option as long as you have data to back up the decision.

Instead say: I am open to that option provided that you have data to back up the decision.

Elaborate

Instead of saying “what do you mean”, you can ask someone to elaborate.

For example…

Don’t say: I’m not sure what you mean by that statement.

Instead say: Can you elaborate on that point?

Imagine

Instead of saying guess, you can say imagine.

For example:

Don’t say: I guess it’s time to test out a new hiring process.

Instead say: I imagine it’s time to test out a new hiring process.

Objective

Instead of saying goal, you can say objective.

For example:

Don’t say: Our goal is to double enrollment in the training.

Instead say: Our objective is to double enrollment in the training.

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