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Performance Reviews

For most managers, conducting effective performance reviews is the most daunting part of their job. Don’t look on it with dread! Make your performance appraisals work for you, not against you with these tools: performance review examples, tips on writing employee reviews, sample performance reviews and employee evaluation forms.
So, your tasked with assessing employee performance and writing performance reviews. Where do you get started?

See more scripts and strategies for writing performance reviews and conducting valuable employee appraisals. Get a sample performance review and employee evaluation forms when you sign up for our Free email newsletter for Leaders & Managers like you…

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If you haven’t found the time in a long while to review your people’s performance, should you just forget about it? Not at all, but as you embark on long-overdue appraisals, keep these points in mind.
“We must declare a worldwide ban on the phrase ‘constructive criticism’; it’s a true oxymoron,” argues Dr. Tim Irwin.
Many organizations around the world use development plans to document their employees' development goals by itemizing the skills they need to improve and the learning activities they should undertake. In theory this is an honorable effort, but in practice, at most organizations development plans have become just another bureaucratic exercise that consumes time and effort without producing the desired results.

No manager enjoys having “the talk” with employees. But ignoring an employee's poor performance won't make the problem go away; it'll only make things worse.

Make sure employees walk away from performance conversations, feeling confident and knowing exactly how to meet your expectations. Follow this advice.

When the opportunity arises to negotiate your compensation package, avoid these three pitfalls if you want to meet your objectives.

At work, numbers speak volumes. If you can’t show, quantitatively, that something is improving, then how can you really know it’s improving? It’s not surprising, then, that more admins are being asked to set SMART goals to be evaluated against.

Performance reviews are relatively easy to do for outstanding performers. Ditto for those who need improvement. Your trouble is with Joe Average.

While the legal requirements to retain records are complex, you're probably safe in dumping those 1984 vacation-day requests. Still, knowing which records to save or toss can be critical to your business, particularly in defending against a lawsuit.

Employers expect employees to get to work on time. Occasional problems with traffic or family issues sometimes make employees late. But chronic tardiness is another thing altogether. While most employers track tardiness occurrences, they should do more. How?

Well-written performance goals help energize employees and point them in right direction. But some managers and HR pros have trouble finding the right words. Here are 10 phrases to adapt, from 2600 Phrases for Setting Effective Performance Goals by Paul Falcone.

Different employees crave different things from their managers. Here’s practical advice you can give the bosses in your organization. You’ll help them focus on the managerial qualities that matter most to employees—and forget about the window dressing workers don’t care about.
Many supervisors are sensitive about rating their people on the basis of a generalized standard or in terms of a numerical scale. Use these tips offered by Elwood N. Chapman in his book, Supervisor’s Survival Kit, to decide on ratings that accurately and fairly reflect workers’ performance.
Q. There’s a big gap between the desired performance that I’d like from people—and their actual output. Apparently, I demand too much (at least that’s what I hear from employee engagement surveys). What am I supposed to do? Lower my standards?
Here are questions you can ask to encourage employee participation in a review meeting.
Performance reviews are an excel­lent time to exchange important information with employees. But to be effective, there must be a genuine exchange.
Do you have current job descriptions for every position on your team? If they're more than six months old, you may have a lot to gain by updating them.
Stuck with formal performance evaluations? Put a positive spin on a tired system.
This is a chance for a healthy reset—one that can reflect well on the people in charge.
When you talk with employees about their performance reviews, beware of using common phrases that can unintentionally communicate the wrong message, or come across as too negative or personal. Certain phrases can kill employee morale, weaken productivity or open up the organization to a discrimination lawsuit. Avoid the following phrases...
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