Workplace Conflict

Our workplace conflict resolution strategies will show you how to handle employee conflict by suggesting conflict management activities

Conflict management styles vary, but whatever approach you choose in dealing with employee conflict, our advice will help you in conflict resolution in the workplace.

Page 4 of 14« First...34510...Last »
There are times when a supervisor and a subordinate simply can’t get along. It’s important for HR to distinguish between a personality conflict and discrimination. The former is cause for concern because it is disruptive and counterproductive. But the latter must be dealt with immediately and firmly—because it’s illegal.
Studies show how hesitant people are to challenge offensive or sexist comments. But psychologist Heidi Grant Halvorson says there are at least three good reasons to confront someone making lewd or sexist comments—despite the fear of retaliation:

Conflict happens in all corners of the workplace. But if issues aren't settled, bad things can happen: Good people quit, morale can plummet and, sometimes, violence can erupt. But supervisors and managers don't need to become certified mediators to settle disputes. You just need to understand some basics about human behavior, practice the fine art of paying attention and offer yourself as a neutral party who wants to resolve the problem.

Workplace bullying is an issue that employers should pay attention to—to get ahead of potential legal obligations and mitigate the high business costs of bullying. Some steps employers might consider taking include: Adopt a "no jerks" rule, and adopt and en­­force an anti-bullying policy.

At work, numbers speak volumes. If you can’t show, quantitatively, that something is improving, then how can you really know it’s improving? It’s not surprising, then, that more admins are being asked to set SMART goals—specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and timely goals—to be evaluated against.

Some of us have had that un­­comfortable moment with a co-worker—an unwelcome ad­­vance, an inappropriate joke, or a colleague who just doesn’t seem to accept your consistent “no’s” to lunch or happy hour invitations. Here are five tips to fend off unwelcome behavior.
When a jaw-droppingly rude email arrives in your inbox, here's how to react: 1.  Draft the email you wish you could send. 2.  Start with, “Thank you.” 3.  Volunteer to get on the phone. 4.  Call her out.

Say one of your employees stops by your office with a troubled look on her face. She has a complaint, but wants to speak with you “off the record.” Can you comply with her request for confidentiality? Should you? It all depends on the content and context of the complaint.

Workplace conflicts often arise because different people have different ways of doing things. Tips for navigating a clash of the styles:

Employees sometimes quit and claim they had no choice because work conditions were so terrible. Sometimes, they sue. In most such cases—the argument is called “constructive discharge”—courts side with employers, provided there’s no evidence the employee suffered an adverse employment action such as a transfer, demotion or pay cut.

Page 4 of 14« First...34510...Last »