Overtime Labor Laws

Federal overtime laws, designed to help end the exempt vs. non-exempt debate, have made things worse. To non-exempt and exempt employees, labor laws continue to confuse.

Business Management Daily can help you comply with federal overtime laws. Learn when you have to pay overtime, and when you don’t.

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The U.S. Department of Labor’s proposed amendments to the Fair Labor Standards Act will have an enormous impact on employers in the retail and hospitality industries.
Don’t make the mistake of thinking that just because an employee is paid a salary, he or she is exempt. The employer must also show that the worker performed exempt work under one of the several exemptions available under the Fair Labor Standards Act.

Employers that don’t track how many hours employees work face a real disadvantage. If an employee sues for unpaid overtime, he or she will be able to use inexact estimates as proof of work done but unpaid. What’s more, should the employee win the case, those estimated hours end up doubled as punishment.

In one state, at least, they're getting very serious about the consequences of shorting employees on what's rightfully theirs.
The Fair Labor Standards Act allows government agencies to offer comp time in lieu of overtime when employees work more than 40 per week. As long as you clearly let employees know that’s how you will treat OT, they can’t complain later.
Investigators from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division have foiled a joint employer scheme they claim attempted to cheat temporary workers out of overtime pay.
Employers can’t retaliate against workers who complain about alleged Fair Labor Standards Act violations. However, not every complaint about pay is protected.

What you call an employee doesn’t determine whether she’s properly classified as exempt. What matters are her duties. If they are routine and menial in nature, she’s not exempt, even if she holds a lofty title within the organization.

What you call an employee doesn’t determine whether she’s properly classified as exempt. What matters are her duties. If they are routine and menial in nature, she’s not exempt, even if she holds a lofty title within the organization.

A Papa John’s pizza franchisee faces jail time for his attempt to evade responsibility for paying overtime to workers at nine stores in the Bronx, N.Y.
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