Dealing with Bosses

Even a good boss is a challenge. But when you’re dealing with bosses, dealing with difficult bosses makes everything twice as hard.

It can often feel as if you’re the one managing the boss. Business Management Daily shows you how to transform you and your boss into an efficient, unstoppable team.

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Ever had to keep covering for a boss who was frequently late, forgetful or just plain not available? We've got advice on what to do from experts and admins.

If your boss institutes a new policy that you find misguided, confusing or downright silly, it may be in the best interest of your team and the organization to share your opinion. However, you must do so without coming across as a change resister or complainer. Follow these steps.

Do you ever feel like your boss distrusts you? If your boss questions your every move or watches over you like a hawk, it feels terrible—especially if you have done nothing to warrant that mistrust. Still, try not to take it so personally. Instead, effectively manage the situation with these steps.

Do you want to impress your boss? Utter these phrases regularly—and back them up with action—and you will be seen as a star employee:
When you disagree with your boss on an issue, always focus your concerns on how it relates to the business. Instead of adding your own personal judgment and opinions, talk about the adverse effects the idea or decision could have on the organization.
Coping with a boss who micromanages is tricky. He or she can make you feel like a child, stifling your creativity and using up too much of your time with unnecessary progress checks. Follow these tips to address the situation:
Improve your relationship with your boss by finding out how he or she prefers to work. How do you determine his or her preferences?
When you’re overloaded, you have two choices: work more stressful, 12-hour days or create a plan to tell your boss that enough is enough. Here’s how to stand up for yourself with tact and professionalism:
If you want your boss to accept your idea, you must choose your approach carefully. You can’t control everything that will affect—or prevent—your boss’s approval. You can, however, increase your chances for success by asking yourself certain questions.
Your relationship with your boss can be good, bad or somewhere in between. Knowing the signs of a dysfunctional relationship can help you decide whether it’s worth working on or if you should just move on, career consultant Jennifer Winter writes.
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