Employment Law

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The EEOC has issued a proposed revision to its guidance on workplace retaliation—the first since 1998—that could radically change how enforcement authorities and courts define retaliation and its causes.

The National Labor Relations Board has issued a new ruling that only solidifies its activist posture of the last few years.

The union membership rate—the percent of hourly and salaried workers who were union members—was 11.1% in 2015, unchanged from 2014, according to the latest numbers from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
What do the EEOC, DOL and NLRB have in store with the $1.1 trillion budget bill passed just before the end of 2015?
If you decide to punish an employee for testifying against you in a legal deposition, be prepared for even more litigation.
Organized labor had what appeared to be a bad day in court Jan. 11 when the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments in a case that asked whether government employees can be required to pay union dues if they object to the union’s political activities.
Government employees have limited First Amendment rights when speaking out. But the right doesn’t apply if the public employee is merely doing his or her job.
When a disabled employee asks for a reasonable accommodation, the employer is supposed to engage in an interactive process to explore the options. But what if you prefer to skip the discussion and simply agree to the employee’s suggested accommodation?
If you use independent contractors to perform design work, make sure your contractor agreement transfers copyrights and other intellectual property rights to you.
Generally, employees who complain to their employer that they aren’t being properly paid or classified under the Fair Labor Standards Act are protected from retaliation for those complaints. But what about a manager?