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Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

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As women continue to speak out for equality in the workplace, employers that align compensation systems and their organizational cultures to support working mothers will attract top talent.
If an employer reassures an applicant that she’s going to be working in a safe environment and that turns out to be incorrect, that worker may be justified in quitting.
Here’s a reminder that drafting employment contracts is best left to the legal experts.
Here’s an important warning for managers with the power to influence hiring decisions: Repeating stereotypes about applicants invites discrimination lawsuits, as a recent case shows.
Advice: Draw a clear line between the activity and your organization’s involvement.
Climbing the corporate ladder still requires the right look, new research from staffing firm OfficeTeam suggests.
People rarely leave their jobs unannounced. They may not use words, but in one way or another, they typically signal their intention to leave. Watch for these key indicators—and then be ready to sit down with the employee to discuss future work plans.
The U.S. Supreme Court upholds the right of employers to require terms that include barring employees from filing class-action lawsuits.
Do you want to push employment disputes into arbitration, but prefer to have a state or federal court hear any trade secret-disputes? Keep those agreements separate.
It’s true your organization may not be liable for co-worker harassment if the harassed employee knew how to report harassment but failed to use the system. However, there can still be consequences if a supervisor retaliates against an employee who complained or threatened to complain but didn’t actually report the harassment.
With the rise of the gig economy, some of your employees may have started a side hustle to bring in extra income. If an employee’s second job leads to working long hours, exhaustion could lower his or her productivity, and in some cases it could create liability for you.
From digital tool and die makers to semiconductor technicians to old-school trades such as plumbers and electricians, people who know how to work with their hands as well as their heads are in short supply.
The bookkeeper for Farm Mercantile in Fairfax, Minn., faces five charges of filing false tax returns because she failed to report $266,333 in embezzled income. In all, she allegedly pocketed $535,000 from the hardware and farm supply store from 1998 to 2016.
Summer youth employment has fallen dramatically in the last 40 years.
It’s likely that the Starbucks incidents reveal some form of discriminatory animus on the part of individual employees. But from a management and HR perspective, there is another layer.
Business needs or employees’ personal circumstances sometimes change, necessitating a revision of a job’s essential functions to include additional tasks or qualifications. What happens if that means the incumbent holding the job can no longer perform those essential functions—especially if she’s disabled?
Since Minneapolis’s Safe and Sick Time Ordinance took effect last July, the city has been working with employers to help them comply with the law. For almost a year, the city has levied no fines. That will all end on July 1.
Do you routinely include an arbitration agreement in your employment applications? It’s a good idea to keep copies of both, in case the employee later claims she didn’t understand what she was signing because of language barriers.
Sometimes an employee discovers she may have a disability, or that it’s time to disclose one she had been keeping secret. How the employer responds to that information may prevent an ADA discrimination lawsuit—or trigger one.
In the era of #MeToo and #TimesUp, the Texas Supreme Court just refused to broadly define sexual harassment in the workplace. Instead, the court found that generalized harassment at work—even if it’s morally reprehensible—doesn’t necessarily violate the Texas Commission on Human Rights Act.
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