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What’s the best title for a middle-management position?

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Question: “We need a title for a middle-management position. We have used the word “supervisor” in the past, but that implies more power than this individual will have. The person in this position will oversee regular employees and help the department manager with certain duties, but they will not have the power to hire, fire or reprimand other employees. These days you cannot be too careful in using titles.” — Debbie Menn

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How about "Lead"? For example, Lead Analyst or Lead Salesperson. Seems to work pretty well for us...

You could use the word Lead. We have a few Leads in our company and it implies that they delegate work and project to their employees.

Perhaps "Coordinator" or "Dept. Lead."

As already suggested, the best title would be Lead. That title is used by our company for people who are a step below supervisor.

The employee could have the Specialist title.

You might consider defining functional grades within a job class. It sounds like you have a level called Manager and another, higher one called Department Manager. To sort out the degrees of authority, you could define Manager I, II, and III. The roles, responsibilities, authorities (including budget and personnel), etc. could be defined in your HR policies. This could help remove the implied authority of the title.

Yes, I agree, something like Team Leader or Coordinator

We use the term "Team Lead" in my office for positions that are not quite to supervisor level. Or another position term that we use is "Specialist" if it is a more individualized position without people reporting to them.

I have a position similar to that and they call me Office Services Coordinator. But generally they say Office Coordinator. because I do a little of everything here and help all the staff and attorneys :)

You might also use "Senior". We use this for an associates that has longevity with our firm and is a great team member to train others but does not have authority to hire/fire or delegate responsibilities.

My suggestion: Administrative Services Coordinator: a professional-level staff position with the authority suggestive in title Manager of Supervisor. Another suggestion: Management Services Specialist.

My suggestion: Administrative Services Coordinator: a professional-level staff position with the authority suggestive in title Manager of Supervisor. Another suggestion: Management Services Specialist.

Where I work, that position is titled 'Team Leader'. They are almost the liaison to the Production Coordinator (Our term for Supervisor), as they conduct the morning meetings, schedule the work assignments for their shifts, and generally run the work floor in their department, but they have no power to hire, fire, or reprimand employees. They must turn to the PC for those duties.

Where I work, that position is titled 'Team Leader'. They are almost the liaison to the Production Coordinator (Our term for Supervisor), as they conduct the morning meetings, schedule the work assignments for their shifts, and generally run the work floor in their department, but they have no power to hire, fire, or reprimand employees. They must turn to the PC for those duties.

Team Leader is the one that comes to mind. Seems to be the number one choice

Positions as you described have either coordinator or specialist in their title. "Lead" in our office is people who can actually supervise staff.

We call them Coordinators and then above them is "Assistant blabla Manager", then Manager and then Practice Administrator. That is our office "tree". The coordinators are more for office flow and to relay needed information to the manager in their absence, but coordinators do not handle staff concers. Assistant Manager do handle staff concerns but don't do things like hire/fire, that is left to the manager.

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