The Savvy Office Manager

Cal Butera is the editor of Business Management Daily’s Office Manager Today, Manager’s Legal Bulletin, Managing People at Work and Communication Briefings newsletters. He has been with Business Management Daily since 2007 and worked 22 years for midsize daily newspapers as sports writer, news reporter, layout and design editor, copy editor and city editor.

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Here are things many bosses unwittingly do that damage and ultimately chase away their good workers.
Here’s a line you may toss at your employees that seems reasonable at the outset, but could have downstream consequences when it comes to productivity, and worse, employee motivation and self-improvement: “As long as you get your work done.”
Here are the top mistakes hiring managers make that lead good job candidates to wonder whether they really want to work for you.
It’s a place you don’t want to enter. And unsurprisingly, many supervisors find themselves there. “There” is the shady side, the underhanded side, the dark side of running the workplace. Whether it’s because of  habit, survival or just a case of “I don’t know why I went there,” it’s a place you need to get out of—quickly.
It’s human nature to judge, especially in the high-stakes game of hiring. Here are job-seekers’ idiosyncrasies that play with your mind, and can twist your judgment.
Most workers understand that if they don’t get their jobs done they could ultimately be replaced. That’s a concept easily grasped. But every workplace has one employee-maybe two, or even more-who is downright difficult to manage.
The following is a short Christmas play. Written in five staves, the play teaches a “what comes around … goes around” lesson to a wayward boss who discovers the true meaning of Christmas one strange, magical night. With apologies to Charles Dickens …
Their true accomplishments revealed, their deepest secrets told with just one reading—that is, if you really do want to know them ...
Just when you thought you’ve seen it all at work, here comes Stan to start his shift with what looks like a sieve on his head. That's right, a sieve. But before you put a stop to it, there's a recent news story you need to consider.
Underperformers really come in only three varieties, and most of them can be repaired, but more easily, prevented from becoming one in the first place.