Remarkable Leadership with Kevin Eikenberry

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Stick and stones may break our bones, but for most of us, words can too — especially when questions are used as weapons. As leaders and good communicators we must think about as asking better questions, but there is more to great questions than the right words, timing and intonation. There is a caveat too …

Stick and stones may break our bones, but for most of us, words can too — especially when questions are used as weapons. As leaders and good communicators we must think about as asking better questions, but there is more to great questions than the right words, timing and intonation. There is a caveat too …

As leaders we have a responsibility for supporting, enabling and expecting our teams to improve their work processes. Because of that fact, today I want to share a trio of important ideas related to process improvement — all important, all worthy of the full space available, yet I determined that giving you a morsel of each was preferable to picking one.

While my message today is always relevant, as we get closer to the end of the year, there are more and more goal-setting conversations. While these conversations are important and necessary, I believe too much emphasis can be placed on goal setting. Not because setting goals isn’t important, but because too many people exert effort to set goals then feel like the job is done, which is like going to the starting line of a race, crouching down in the blocks and feeling like you don’t need to run the race because your work is already done.

Persuasion is not manipulation. If a connection between those words crosses your mind, it is time to eradicate it — and my goal in this short post is to help you do just that.

I often get asked by leaders of internal groups how they can create a Customer focus when their team has no direct connection or interaction with the paying Customer. I dealt with this as a Supervisor when I worked at Chevron many years ago, so my advice comes from my three-part combo experience: As a leader in the middle of an organization, as a former sales person in that same organization, and now as a business owner and consultant for 23 years. Given that perspective, here is my three part answer to the question.

I often say that the feedback you give says as much about you as it does the person you are giving it to, and when I do people look at me funny. After all, the feedback I give you is about something you did, it isn’t about me at all, is it? Not so fast, my friend.

I often say that the feedback you give says as much about you as it does the person you are giving it to, and when I do people look at me funny. After all, the feedback I give you is about something you did, it isn’t about me at all, is it? Not so fast, my friend.

As a leader, you are a part of at least two teams — the team you lead and your team of peers. Often leaders don’t focus enough of their energy and time on one or the other of those teams, to everyone’s detriment. Today, I want to talk about how to build relationships with your peer team — especially if you are new, and they aren’t.

Dialogue is a fabulous communication tool. It allows for clarity of understanding, closure and complete communication. When you think about it that way, you’d think — why wouldn’t I want to use it?

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