People Management

With some employees, it isn’t a matter of ability, it’s a matter of attitude. And while you can’t control someone’s horrible personality, you can decide how you’re going to respond. Use these scripts and strategies to confront problem employees and effectively manage employee discipline so you can bring motivating back to the forefront of your workday.

The first rule of people management is not to let one bad apple spoil your whole bunch. Difficult people can put a strain on the productive members of your team.

Make the most of your human capital. Browse our articles on the good, the bad and the ugly of People Management…

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In October 2008, Fred Tomczyk spent his first month as TD Ameritrade’s CEO under fire. He found himself running the financial services firm amid a punishing global economic crisis. But rather than retreat into survival mode, he decided to overhaul the firm’s business model.
For 90 days, Google analyzed the relative search volume for “hangover cure.”

Dave Yost, retired CEO of AmerisourceBergen, says he could’ve arrived at the office at 8 a.m. and performed his job just fine. But he showed up at 6:30 a.m. to signal to others that he valued a full day of work. He could’ve traveled first class or used a corporate jet. But he flew coach like his employees to convey the importance of frugality—a key part of the wholesale drug distributor’s culture.

Workers who call in sick usually get the benefit of the doubt, but 31% of managers polled by CareerBuilder.com say they have checked to see if an absent employee was telling the truth.

For George Zimmer, leadership is all about finding answers to tough questions. For 40 years, he ran retail chain Men’s Wearhouse from 1973 until spring 2014. Soon after he launched the company in 1973, he addressed a series of questions that guided his management philosophy.

Stepping in to lead a pre-existing team demands a sound management strategy. Will you have one when the time comes?
Today’s knowledge workers spend only 45% of their time on primary job duties. The other 55% is squandered on meetings, email and administrivia. Here’s what workers say causes lost productivity.
Maybe we shouldn't be so quick to crack down on the ones who greet both the dawn and the dusk with a hearty "Let's do something already!"
Liz Wiseman suggests putting them in surprising situations where their deeply rooted expectations will be challenged.

Productivity and morale are the main casualties when organizations retain people who clearly aren’t doing their jobs. The Harvard Business Review suggests managers follow these three C’s to deal with an underperformer.

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