Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

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Some executives equate leading with infallibility. They assume that they must project an intimidating I-know-­everything superiority to earn the respect of their team. Yet attempting to know it all is an exercise in futility.

One of the healthiest signs of a strong organizational culture involves employees’ attitudes. Do they confront challenges with gusto? Or do they seem defeated from the start? When employees exhibit these four attitudes, it’s usually a good sign of a “yes we can” culture.
Take your next step using David Allen’s two-minute rule ... Reconsider voice mail ... Exercise gratitude.
Because of Big Data, the leadership industry is in decline. Today, business is driven by “quants” who excel at extracting data or producing algorithms that can automate work, but are not so good at putting numbers into words.
John Maeda, president of the Rhode Island School of Design until 2013 and now a partner with Kleiner Perkins, offers tips on keeping your edge.

It’s tempting to frame lots of things as the silver bullet. But with enough thought and study, you can identify a concept called “controlling insight” as that one thing.

Sarah Nahm had no idea what she would be doing when she showed up for work at Google right out of college. Now she's the CEO of her own company. Here's her advice for leaders.
When Daniel Lubetzky launched his own company in 2004, he also launched a personal mission: He wanted to build an organization based on kindness. Lubetzky has dedicated his company to inspiring others to live a kind life.
To set a consistent strategy for her 300,000 employees at Hewlett-Packard, Meg Whitman requires that all her managers read a business book: Playing to Win by A.G. Lafley.
"You can’t have more than one persona," says CEO Tom Raffio. "You have to be the same person in the boardroom and the mailroom."
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