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Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

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A good night’s sleep helps with job performance, but do you know just how much sleep really counts? Here are the top warning signs you need more than a nap, courtesy of Nectar.
Different employees crave different things from their managers. Here’s practical advice you can give the bosses in your organization. You’ll help them focus on the managerial qualities that matter most to employees—and forget about the window dressing workers don’t care about.
“There’s a great value and power to saying ‘I’m sorry’ and ‘thank you’ in the corporate world. The first time someone apologizes or says a genuine ‘thank you,’ the whole environment shifts.”
When you get close to making a decision, apply this “4R Test” for leaders.
Do you find yourself thinking you have what it takes to accept more responsibility? Here are five things you can do to position yourself for upward mobility.
Make sure you have job descriptions for all employees’ positions. Then keep those descriptions updated whenever the duties change.
Watch out for these common email practices that undermine your employees’ most important work.
Do you find yourself thinking you have what it takes to accept more responsibility? Here are five things you can do to position yourself for upward mobility.
Is your HR department understaffed or overstaffed? Here's a formula to correctly calculate your organization HR-to-employee ratio.
Rhonda Finniss, who leads workshops on handling anger in the workplace, offers these suggestions to help you manage your emotions.
Here are Morey Stettner’s simple action steps so that one day—hopefully no time soon—we can be of immense value to a staff searching for answers and comfort.
You’ve been approached to be on a board. You are flattered! But, should you accept? There is a lot to consider as you weigh the time, personal investment, and—at times—risk. Cheryl Hyatt of Hyatt-Fennell Executive Search has five tips for evaluating a board position to make sure it’s right for you.

How not to avoid paying overtime.

He always was a hard worker, but it was Harrison Ford’s ability to push beyond good to excellent that propelled him into leadership.

To win an argument, don’t rush to argue. Showing trust and respect can prove more formidable than building an airtight case.

Decisions always have a ripple effect of unforeseen consequences.

Would you rehire a person who left your company and wants to come back? How do you decide if they are a good candidate? Cheryl Hyatt, of Hyatt Fennell Executive Search, offers some criteria to evaluate.

Managers should never retaliate against an employee who sticks up for an alleged harassment victim or makes overtures to help that person’s case. Such behavior will quickly turn into a costly retaliation lawsuit.

Charles R. Schwab, billionaire and legend in low-cost investing who managed to become a household name, has this advice to investors just starting out.

Even if people are not as rational as we’d hope, there are steps we can take to mitigate our biases. 

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