Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

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If you treat customers as equals, focusing on them as individuals, you’ll stay on the right path. Here’s a list of don’ts.
Drew Greenblatt knew that Marlin Steel could not survive Chinese competitors, who were luring away his customers—big bagel chains that bought the company's wire baskets. The Baltimore firm was struggling to stay afloat in 2003 when a fateful call from a Boeing engineer led to some market research that changed everything.
Michael Norton and Elizabeth Dunn, co-authors of Happy Money, asked a group of high-net-worth individuals how much wealth it would take to trigger true contentment.
Stay humble, stay bold, stay flexible. Use these three famous examples as your guide.

Few execs start off with the intent to lie or defraud. Instead, they make the mistake of getting ensnared by one seemingly minor infraction. How does many a downfall escalate from there?

Scott Cook, co-founder and chairman of Intuit, has built a huge company helping executives make decisions using his financial management software. Yet Cook frowns on financial forecasting. In fact, he requests that his employees avoid spending time forecasting the numbers relating to their unit’s sales and expenses.

When you’re not clear on what you do best, your company’s identity and marketing message get so diluted they don’t resonate with anyone. That’s why it’s important to have a clear mental picture of your ideal client.
When Mattel hired Richard Dickson as general manager of its Barbie brand in 2008, the famous doll was in a lull. After hitting a high of $1.52 billion in ­Barbie sales in 2002, Mattel had struggled through a six-year decline. Dickson hit the ground running to put an end to "brand goulash."
The story of the man CNBC named one of the worst American CEOs of all time teaches a lesson in how to conduct yourself with employees.
In late 2008, Domino’s market share was plummeting. Instead of blaming collapsing sales on the nation’s economic downturn, executives chose a surprising strategy: They admitted their main product—pizza—wasn’t very good. Then Patrick Doyle took it a step further.
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