Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

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Arthur T. Demoulas prefers to lead quietly. He’s the longtime CEO of Market Basket, a regional supermarket chain in New England.
Asked about their go-to person in making important business decisions, 750 owners of small companies admitted mostly going it alone.
By secretly tampering with its cars’ emissions controls for years, German automaker Volkswagen has dealt itself a self-inflicted wound.
To lead with integrity, study Sepp Blatter’s 17-year run as president of FIFA—and do the opposite. Blatter, 79, announced his resignation from inter­national soccer’s governing body in June after years of fending off allega­­tions of corruption.
The point of a business is to make money. But revenue generated under negative circumstances brings with it some troubling baggage—and it’ll likely bite you in the long run.
Take defeat graciously ... Don’t toil too much ... Winning is what it’s all about.

In early 2011, Ofra Strauss was enjoying life at the top. She ran Israeli food maker Strauss Group, a global company with revenues of $1.8 billion. But then an unemployed young man started criticizing the company on Facebook for pricing its chocolates too high ...

Most business travelers (88%) consider their trips successful. According to an industry survey, three factors make for a good business trip: the number of meetings, the length of stay and how early you book the trip.
Even the smartest, most diligent leaders fall into traps that can stymie their performance. They may not realize that their actions or behavior can work against them. Steer clear of these four common traps.
We’re all subject to lapses that make us look unprofessional. Here are seven reminders of what to avoid.
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