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Office Communication

Communication in business requires the understanding of different communication styles, and the ability to break down communication barriers.

In business communication, effective communication requires a sort of “office communication toolkit” – the kind of resource Business Management Daily provides.

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To truly learn what matters to your employees, motivates them and holds them back at work, surveys are the way to go. Just make sure you follow these tips to receive honest, useful responses.
Gathering your entire organization together is a great way to share information and boost transparency. Follow these tips to run a meeting effectively.
Your organization is generating a ton of content, ranging from staff and product descriptions and marketing copy to blogs and larger assets—and many stakeholders are involved. To ensure consistency, create content templates.
One of the most important roles you can play as a leader is that of motivator—even when employees haven’t met expectations. Instead of kicking employees when they’re down, use these phrases to refocus them and inspire them to move forward.
As you might already know, it’s quite easy to let what started out as a civil conversation turn nasty. Here are four surefire ways to turn a healthy debate into an all-out donny­brook.
While you may be able to get away with it in your personal life, disrespectful, offensive language has no place at work. Before you write or speak, T.H.I.N.K.
When the conversation turns political, religious, too personal or controversial, or it just seems to go on forever, here’s how to change the topic without offending others.

Steel yourself—we want you to put your upcoming talk through this aggressive 12-point test. Our goal is to poke, nitpick and annoy until you have all your bases covered and can come off like an awesome leader, not a text reader.Let the tough love begin! 

What’s the biggest faux pas when writing emails? Making them too long. “A long email is a signal you’re using the wrong communication tool,” says Leigh Stringer, author of The Healthy Workplace. Here are two great reasons to keep your emails short and sweet.
People tend to use “I’m sorry” too much, and that causes two big problems: the speaker looks less confident and it reduces the impact of a genuine, warranted apology. Stop using the phrase so much, and instead say the following in these situations.
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