• LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google+

Career Management

Successful career development is more than doing a good job. Dressing for success, business writing skills, career networking – all are vitally important.

Business Management Daily’s succinct, workplace-tested career advice is designed to help you position yourself to succeed in your chosen field.

Page 40 of 63« First...102030...3839404142...5060...Last »
These days, social networking—through LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter—is how many people make and strengthen their connections. Maribeth Kuzmeski, author of The Connectors, says that using a few simple rules of thumb can help make your social networking more efficient.
Q. If one of our managers overhears an employee discussing his genetic information, is our company liable under GINA?

Which of these is correct? 1. Please book my reservation for Saturday, June 1st. 2. Please book my reservation for Saturday, June first. 3. Please book my reservation for Saturday, June 1.

The 3,000 military veterans, National Guard members and reservists who work for Gaithersburg, Md.-based Sodexo have their own club: the year-old HONOR group. The networking group within the giant food-services company offers support, guidance and resources to employees and families connected to the military.

Employers are emerging from the Great Recession with a different view of compensation and benefits. And, in most cases, that’s a good thing. Lessons learned in the lean years are being adapted and modified to make organizations stronger in this post-recession landscape. Look for these 11 trends to take a firm hold in 2011:

Sometimes, a general word isn’t clear enough when writing e-mail or other correspondence. Use defining words to make sure the reader clearly understands what you’re saying, advises Craig Hogan, author of Explicit Business Writing:
Employers are increasingly using web-based social media—such as Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter—to screen potential employees, in addition to the usual applications, interviews, references, and background, credit and drug tests. But they don’t always recognize the potential pitfalls and risks.

What’s the best way to get a job right now? Networking, according to a recent survey of HR execs by Challenger, Gray & Christmas. The best (and easiest) way to nurture your online network is through LinkedIn, the one social networking site you can’t ignore if you’re a professional. Here’s how to best use the web site:

Join The HR Specialist in celebrating the second annual “HR Professionals Week,” a five-day tribute to all that human resources pros do to make American workplaces more effective and American businesses more successful. It happens Monday, Feb. 28–Friday, March 4.

Update your image by Botoxing your résumé, says Lisa Johnson Mandell, author of Career Comeback: Repackage Yourself to Get the Job You Want. Like the cosmetic procedure, Botoxing your résumé is a way to “lift, firm and freshen your look,” says Mandell.

The EEOC has published its final regulations implementing Title II of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA). They take effect on Jan. 10. The new regulations clarify when employers may be liable for acquiring genetic information.
Question: “I often feel like an outsider in my office. I am 61, overweight, and have gray hair. My co-workers are in their 20s and 30s. The whole group goes out for “happy hour” once every six weeks ... I usually avoid these get-togethers because I don’t feel comfortable with the youngsters ... Do you think I should start going?” — Old & Gray
In another example of the complex interplay between social media and HR, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) reached a settlement on Feb. 7, 2011, in the closely watched “Facebook Firing” case.
The National Labor Relations Board has settled with a company that fired an employee for posting negative comments about a boss on her Facebook page. The case seems to signal that employee communications that happen via social media constitute protected activity under federal law. Does your social media policy go too far?

In what could be a groundbreaking case, the National Labor Relations Board filed an unfair labor practice complaint last month against a Connecticut company that fired a worker who complained about her supervisor on Facebook. This is the first case in which the NLRB has argued that workers’ criticisms on social networking sites are protected activity.

Pay attention to first impressions—the ones you’re making on others ... Steel your resolve by clenching a muscle ... Increase productivity by keeping one to-do list ... Optimists find jobs more easily than their peers and are more likely to be promoted ...
With its workaday reputation, LinkedIn is still the go-to social-media site for anyone trying to ramp up a career. Krista Canfield, a LinkedIn spokeswoman, says that to reap the social-networking benefits of the site, you need at least 35 connections. Here’s how to best use the web site:
Feel like your ideas are falling on deaf ears? Maybe it's your sales pitch, not the proposal. Focus your "pitch" with these tactics:
Say one of your employees posts vulgar comments on her Facebook page mocking the company or her boss. Other co-workers see it and add their own comments. You have a policy against such actions, so you can fire her, right? Not so fast.

Signing a contract is always a hair-raising and nervous experience. But signing a hotel, convention center or other facility's standard contract for your company could damage your organization's financial well being. To protect yourself, ask to review the standard contract, but consider that as only a starting point.

Page 40 of 63« First...102030...3839404142...5060...Last »