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Career Management

Successful career development is more than doing a good job. Dressing for success, business writing skills, career networking – all are vitally important.

Business Management Daily’s succinct, workplace-tested career advice is designed to help you position yourself to succeed in your chosen field.

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Since the back is involved in almost every move a person makes, discomfort there can be particularly annoying. Relief for back pain is the second most common reason Americans head to the doctor.
A variety of recent studies have ex­­plored the connections be­­tween people’s motivation during workouts and the music they listen to as they exercise. What they’ve found is that music does make a difference.

Workplace rejection is a painful but expected part of life. Of course, no one wants to be turned down for a job or promotion, but when it does happen there are ways you can cope. Here are three strategies offered by Debra Wheatman, of Careers Done Write.

The desire for meaningful work is one of the great aspirations of our age. One leader to keep in mind as you try to “find” your career path is the scientist and Nobel laureate Marie Curie, who didn’t actually discover her vocation so much as cultivate it through trial and error.
Susan Nolen-Hoeksema, a Yale psychology professor specializing in depression, has studied people’s tendency to brood when facing a problem. She found that a simple, 10-minute diversion can turn self-punishing thoughts into action.
If you aren’t advancing as you’d like and it seems like your career is going nowhere, here are four possible reasons and solutions, offered by executive coach Joel Garfinkle, author of Getting Ahead: Three Steps to Take Your Career to the Next Level.
Every career comes with its share of challenges, but great em­­ployees overcome them. Deloitte CEO Joe Echevarria recently shared his best ad­­vice for overcoming whatever career obstacles you may face.
Success is not measured by the quality you have in your own work, but by the value you offer others in their work, writes Ben Drake, communications and branding leader at be-influential.com, who offers these value-adding tips.
Create a home base online ... Make your inbox wait ... Get the perfect workout in 7 minutes ... Learn to sell to succeed.
Tiredness is a common complaint of many managers, and discovering its root cause is vital to keeping you on top of your game.
Business conferences: Some people love them, but others find them stressful, intimidating and overwhelming. If you’re in the latter group, writer and editor Sarah Todd has tips to help you out.
Research has shown that having a mentor can help boost your salary and your happiness, so if you don’t have one yet you should be on the hunt for one. Meredith Fineman has had plenty of mentors throughout the course of her career and offers five tips for finding one.
Jennifer B. Kahnweiler is an Atlanta-based author, speaker and executive coach who has been hailed as a “champion for introverts.” We reached out to her to learn more about the power of introverts in the office.
Networking comes naturally for some, but not so much for others, writes Equitable Payments co-founder Darrah Brustein. Her tips:

You need great confidence if you want to be a successful leader, writes InPower Consulting President and CEO Dana Theus, who offers five steps to help you boost yours.

Valuable or not, self-assessments seem here to stay, so you need to figure out how to do them well in a way that’s honest without appearing arrogant or getting yourself in trouble. Harvard Business Review contributing editor Amy Gallo compiled expert advice on how to do just that.
Popular culture has promoted the idea of the Queen Bee boss—a woman executive who actively blocks the career advancement of other women (think Meryl Streep’s role in “The Devil Wears Prada”). While it makes for a juicy character, it’s far from today’s workplace reality, according to a Cata­lyst report.
Through his work with dozens of entrepreneurs, motivational speaker and real es­tate investor Paul LeJoy has discovered eight problems that are sure to trip people up as they strive to succeed in their work.
There are basically two types of people in the workplace—those motivated to do well by prevention and those motivated by promotion, writes Heidi Grant Halvorson, associate director of Columbia Uni­­ver­­sity’s Motivation Science Center. Research shows these two types of people need different strategies to succeed.
If you stick to your ethics 10 out of 10 times, you won’t regret where you end up. The challenge is in defining for yourself where you stand, and drawing a clear line.
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