• LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google+

Payroll Management

Ineffective payroll management and shoddy payroll systems can result in personal liability (including JAIL TIME) for non-compliance.

Business Management Daily helps our readers with information on payroll processing and tips on timesheets that will help you to implement payroll programs that pay off.

Page 38 of 54« First...102030...3637383940...50...Last »

Q. Can a Texas employer require employees to accept payment of wages through an electronic transfer of funds?

Payroll isn’t an easy subject to master, so it’s a safe bet that employees in your company don’t have a clue about what goes on in your office. That makes explaining key payroll changes to employees difficult. Tips from two payroll managers at large organizations:

Q: If an employer underwithheld income taxes by not using an employee’s W-4 form properly, and the employee is assessed interest and penalties when he files his 1040, can he hold the employer responsible for the interest and penalties, or even the underwithholding?

Question: Our company contracts with an employee who quit and started his own business. We know he had a child support withholding order in place and that the order remains in effect. Must we continue to withhold child support?

August is a slog. Forget the heat and humidity by organizing your Payroll tasks for the next four months.

Payroll usually doesn’t withhold income and FICA taxes from employees who receive restricted stock until the restriction lapses and the stock vests. Under Section 83(b), however, employees can opt to have taxes withheld currently, long before the restriction lapses. The IRS has now provided sample language for an 83(b) election.

Employees who get married but forget to update their Social Security cards with their married names will lose out, because the Social Security Administration won’t be able to credit their earnings to their benefits accounts. Remind newlyweds to get replacement Social Security cards showing their new names.
Group health insurers that don’t spend between 80 and 85 cents of every premium dollar on medical care and health care quality improvement must make so-called medical loss ratio (MLR) rebates to employees, beginning Aug. 1, 2012.

Today’s tight economy has prompted many employers to try to reduce costs—including overtime—by classifying workers as independent contractors instead of employees. That hasn’t escaped the notice of the IRS and the U.S. Department of Labor, which have stepped up efforts to deter misclassification.

Under tax code Section 83, you don’t have to tax employees who receive company stock, stock options or other property that is subject to a substantial risk of forfeiture until the risk lapses and the property vests. Proposed regulations now define what counts as a substantial risk of forfeiture.

It seems counterintuitive, but you can use your consent to extend the statute of limitations on payroll tax assessments as leverage with auditors. But only if the proper party signs Form SS-10, Consent to Extend the Time to Assess Employment Taxes. The IRS has concluded in emailed advice that a single-member LLC owner is the correct party to sign.
Not ­getting your tax notices forwarded to your new address can be a deadly oversight. To separate out notifications from individuals and businesses, the IRS has created new Form 8822-B.
Payroll procedures for handling bonuses are affected by the FLSA. While such bonuses can increase morale, provide incentive to work harder, and entice strong applicants to join a company, improper treatment of employee bonuses can lead to FLSA violations. 

Nowadays, IRS auditors ask for your electronic accounting records. But software files often contain data beyond the audit years, and software programs routinely create metadata for every data file created. So how do you keep the IRS from snooping around the personal and confidential business informations contained in those files?

The Fair Labor Standards Act doesn’t require you to provide employees with meal breaks. It does require you to pay employees whose meal breaks last for fewer than 30 minutes and those who work through their meal breaks. However, 40 states do have laws covering meal and rest breaks. This chart summarizes those laws.

$3,400: That’s how much the tax gap—the difference between what’s owed and what’s paid—costs every single taxpayer in extra taxes. And the figure is only growing. Proposals to close the tax gap were raised at a recent congressional hearing.

The FLSA restricts the docking of employees' pay. Many times employers' decisions on docking will push an employee from an exempt classification to a nonexempt, or push an employee whose pay has been docked into court.
Few eligible small employers are claiming the health care tax credit, despite the IRS’ numerous public relations efforts, according to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration. Among the reasons given for the low take-up rate: It took too long and it was too hard to claim the credit.
The IRS has been busy adding to its regulatory agenda. Here’s the latest news from the regulations front.
Anita Bartels, the IRS' senior program analyst for employment tax policy, appeared at the American Payroll Association’s 30th Annual Congress, held this year in Orlando, Fla., to report on some major initiatives and to clarify others. Here’s the rundown on three hot payroll issues.
Page 38 of 54« First...102030...3637383940...50...Last »