• LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google+

Dealing with Bosses

Even a good boss is a challenge. But when you’re dealing with bosses, dealing with difficult bosses makes everything twice as hard.

It can often feel as if you’re the one managing the boss. Business Management Daily shows you how to transform you and your boss into an efficient, unstoppable team.

Page 3 of 912345...Last »
No matter what level you’re at, adopting these three behaviors is sure to impress your boss, Ora Shtull writes.
Just because your manager can be strict about your schedule doesn’t mean that he should, writes Suzanne Lucas. If your boss has suddenly instituted draconian rules, try to figure out the reason.

An incompetent boss is annoying at best and damaging to your career at worst. To keep your career moving forward in spite of a clueless boss, Dorothy Tannahill-Moran recommends these five actions.

As nice as it would be for bosses to be superhuman, they’re just like everyone else. Some are com­petent and compassionate; others are inept and inconsiderate. Some tactics for toughing it out with a bad boss:
On the surface, a boss or a co-worker who constantly interrupts you may come off as a bit of a jerk. However, it may simply be that in­­ter­­rupting is the only way he knows how to communicate, writes workplace communication consultant Guy Farmer.

Admins make roughly $15,000 worth of decisions every year, according to an IAAP Benchmarking survey. Yet it’s sometimes hard to know whether to make a decision on your own or wait for the boss to weigh in. Here’s one litmus test for determining whether to forge ahead or wait for a nod from the boss.

Start each day with a prioritized to-do list, dividing it into A-B-C tasks ... Ditch the half-truths, even the little white lies you tell to make someone feel better ... Earn respect of senior management by showing the ROI for whatever you’re proposing.

Opening your email inbox to find a message criticizing your work is bad enough. But it’s even worse when you notice that your boss was cc’d on the message. An administrative professional re­­cently encountered this situation and wrote about it on our online forum.

Phil, an administrative assistant, re­­cently lamented that his efforts to improve his boss’s communication were going unheeded. But perhaps it’s not what Phil’s boss wants from Phil. When someone hands you his work to look over, first determine what he wants in return.
Not all executives are content to have access to documents only on their smartphones, tablets or laptops. If you work for a boss who still depends heavily on paper and attends up to a dozen meetings a day, here's an organizing solution for you.
Sarah spent the afternoon working on a quarterly report for her boss, only to hear this when she delivered it at day’s end: “This isn’t a final version, is it? It won’t be a problem for you to work overtime today and fix this, will it?” Her boss just de­­livered a question trap—a leading question.

When you’re thrust into working environments, you deal with all sorts of people on a daily basis. If you don’t get along with some of them, the hours can drag on. If these people are your bosses, the days can seem like torture. Here’s how to manage your manager.

“My boss carried several boxes of files into the office one day because his wife told him to remove them from their garage. They have been sitting in the office for more than two years! He won’t let me throw anything away.” What can this admin do about a boss who’s a hoarder?

The best executive assistants are indispensable. But, initially, many have trouble developing the trust and understanding needed for a strong assistant-boss relationship. Trudy Vitti knows how difficult the initial steps of a new assistant-boss relationship can be ...

Strike the right chord with a new boss by trying these tactics from other experienced administrative pros:
Sorting through files can seem like an archeological dig. Every time someone new comes in, that person doesn't understand the previous system and builds a new set of files—electronic and paper—on top.

The bond between a boss and assis­­tant is far from ordinary. And feelings of devotion often run both ways. Consider these true life-saving stories of assistants and their executives:

Nearly half (46%) of employees say they’ve worked for an unreasonable manager. Most (59%) stayed in their jobs, despite working with a bad boss, according to an OfficeTeam survey.

Good news for the bosses of the world: Most employees (59%) say their direct supervisors are doing a good or even great job. However, 20% of the respondents to the CareerBuilder.com survey say their supervisors’ performance is poor or very poor. The biggest gripes?

In your relationship with your boss, who sets the tone for the relationship? Your boss? Test your assumption. You probably have more power than you think to shape the way you work together. Ask yourself these seven questions to improve your relationship:

Page 3 of 912345...Last »