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Team Building

In most companies, when you get results, you get rewards. And if you can’t lead teams to success, you’ll end up stuck in a job with no exit. Use this strategic blending of common-sense strategies and implementable team building exercises to build and bolster your winning team…

You want to improve teamwork. So you reward group performance, praise any signs of collaboration and prod loners to become joiners. That’s a good start, but why stop there?

Make sure your team is working more like the Manhattan Project and less like Enron… Use these articles, exercises and strategies to get your team building training up and running!

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Invite employees to offer three levels of new and innovative ideas.
Don’t lose hope if you haven’t experienced a “Eureka!” moment when it comes to your next big idea. The discovery of new ideas doesn’t come to you out of the blue.
You can provide ongoing training—on a shoestring budget—by starting a book club. It’s simple: The team commits to reading a book by a selected due date, and then you meet to discuss what you have learned.

To create a more collaborative culture, CEO Gregg Steinhafel encourages Target's 365,000 employees to harness social media. The retail giant has developed an internal online platform that enables workers at all levels to post comments, share ideas and engage in Facebook-like interaction with each other.

Christine Comaford, author of the new book SmartTribes, says good team leaders can become great team leaders by following this code of conduct:
To develop a self-managing team, start by limiting your demands and requirements. Instead, pose open-ended questions so that the group can grapple with setting its own rules.
Based on the name alone, you can probably guess the purpose of the TeamworkPM app. This tool helps you manage and collaborate with your team and clients.

If there is one thing that takes a team off of its focus or its ability to innovate, it is conflict. Yet conflict is unavoidable. It’s part of the human dynamics of people working together. How a manager approaches conflict can elevate a team’s performance and increase its ability to produce results. Here are the three best ways to deal with team conflict.

Bossy know-it-alls make poor team ­leaders. To build unity among your group, display humility and strive to learn from others. Avoid communicating these five destructive messages to your team.

How can a leader motivate team members to move them toward mutual goals that enhance productivity? It’s all about team-building exercises. But before you choose an exercise, ask yourself two questions ...
Managers are usually adept at handling small teams, but as companies develop and grow, you need to be ready to lead larger groups.
Team-building activities help workers learn about one another and bond. The hope is that the information gained and camaraderie created will positively influence daily office life. But not all employees are willing participants and may see "forced fun" as manipulative or a waste of time. Here's how to get more workers on board:
Just as an arch provides support for a structure, teams act as the foundation for any successful organization.
Leading requires a range of behaviors. From supportive coaching to skeptical questioning, you need to spur others to perform at their consistent best. Adopt these four styles to lift others’ performance.
Studies of diversity have exploded in the decades since it was recognized that most new entrants to the 21st century workforce would be women and minorities. University of Michigan researcher Scott Page shows how diversity helps organizations. Here are three of his lessons on putting diversity to work.
If your team isn’t sitting in the same office or even the same state, you may need some new management prac­­tices to keep things running smoothly. Try these tips from Travefy co-founder David Donner Chait.
How many times have you heard someone say, “He was the best boss I ever had”? Team members are motivated working with a boss whom they like and admire.

In the 1920s, Alfred Sloan ran General Motors. When he convened his management team to explore whether to open a plant abroad, they all approved the move. Sloan replied that he wouldn’t make a decision until he heard some disagreement. He wanted the best judgments to flow from clashing viewpoints.

Raising teamwork to the next level doesn’t mean you must hire team-building consultants and send employees on Outward Bound. Take these simpler steps.

When teams sputter, conflicts can erupt. As the leader, you can insist that difficult personalities find a way to get along. Encourage diverse teams to look past their differences. Use these strategies to cure your team's negativity.

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