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Team Building

In most companies, when you get results, you get rewards. And if you can’t lead teams to success, you’ll end up stuck in a job with no exit. Use this strategic blending of common-sense strategies and implementable team building exercises to build and bolster your winning team…

You want to improve teamwork. So you reward group performance, praise any signs of collaboration and prod loners to become joiners. That’s a good start, but why stop there?

Make sure your team is working more like the Manhattan Project and less like Enron… Use these articles, exercises and strategies to get your team building training up and running!

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There’s no foolproof way to build teams, but good ones share these approaches.
Hailed as a creative genius, physicist ­William Shockley mastered quantum theory and led a team to invent the transistor. But he did it the hard way.
In 2013, the leaders of Pictometry Inter­­national decided to get more bang for their buck to boost morale among their 250 employees. So they focused on food.
Researchers at MIT and George Washington University studied eight years of data at a big U.S. professional services company. Inspecting revenue figures, employee surveys and other workplace metrics, researchers found that more diverse teams significantly outperform homogeneous groups.

Asked how to prepare for a football playoff, coach Craig Bohl recommends adopting a mindset he calls “one-and-done.” Bohl won his third consecutive FCS (NCAA’s Football Championship Subdivision) national title when his North Dakota State team won its division in 2013. That makes Bohl, now the coach at Wyoming, college football’s leading expert on playoffs.

When Jay Gould joined American Standard in 2012 as CEO, he faced a liquidity crisis. Draining cash, the once-venerable plumbing company was on the brink of collapse. The company's 5,500 employees had gotten used to layoffs, and there was little reason to believe more weren't coming. Gould needed a way to boost morale, and he found it.
Andrew Field, president and CEO of PrintingForLess.com, has articulated the principles that guide his leadership.
There are at least five good reasons to involve your team in the hiring process.
When your team is struggling, using the word “together” can motivate people, increase performance and boost morale, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology.
Start the year off in a positive direction with a team meeting that serves dual purposes: to share a plan for 2015 and to have some fun.

During times when your team is excelling, it can be easy to skip praising employees. After all, it should seem obvious to employees that they are doing well because you are hitting your goals and exceeding everyone’s expectations. Don’t make that mistake.

You can waste many hours of precious time if you don’t run a tight business meeting. Here are five ways to do it right.
A creative brainstorm can strike at any time, perhaps while you’re in the shower or taking a walk. Effective leaders prod their team to innovate by recognizing and capitalizing on such creative connections.
Never waste an opportunity to celebrate. “There is just not enough celebrating going on at work,” says renowned leader Jack Welch.

Until recently, National Hockey League goalies were overwhelmingly Canadian. Then the Finns arrived around 2000. Seemingly overnight, 5 million Finns began producing one-sixth of the NHL’s starting goalies. Their secret is Urpo Ylönen, or “Upi,” a man spoken of the same way Jedi knights speak of Yoda or Obi-Wan Kenobi.

When researching and collecting data about toxic workplaces, which eventually led to his co-authoring the book Rising Above a Toxic Workplace, Paul White discovered three distinct symptoms of a toxic workplace:
If you want to blow your competition out of the water, you need more than just a great idea. You need a team that can turn that idea into reality.
At Pixar, the movie studio behind blockbusters such as “Toy Story” and “Cars”, Ed Catmull cultivated a culture in which filmmakers could share ideas and opinions in a free-flowing, nonthreatening manner. He devised the Braintrust, a regular series of management meetings where the primary purpose is straight talk.
At first glance, you might not think im­­provisational comedy and organizational teamwork share much in common. But they do.
When people band together to achieve an ambitious goal, it can heighten everyone’s sense of camaraderie. That’s what happened in Seattle in the lead-up to the Seahawks’ Super Bowl win in 2014.
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