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Team Building

In most companies, when you get results, you get rewards. And if you can’t lead teams to success, you’ll end up stuck in a job with no exit. Use this strategic blending of common-sense strategies and implementable team building exercises to build and bolster your winning team…

You want to improve teamwork. So you reward group performance, praise any signs of collaboration and prod loners to become joiners. That’s a good start, but why stop there?

Make sure your team is working more like the Manhattan Project and less like Enron… Use these articles, exercises and strategies to get your team building training up and running!

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Get in the spirit of Read Across America Day.

Do you have employees who clock in before their shift starts, then stand around drinking coffee for a half-hour? How can you cut down on this “on-the-clock-but-standing-around” time? ...

People who hog credit and dislike playing second fiddle may work to undermine high-flying peers. You need to encourage teamwork between titans.

High-performance leaders revolutionize their roles by changing the dynamic between leader and follower: Not only do they hold team members accountable for results, but they themselves expect to be held accountable by team members. Being held accountable requires a thick skin and brave employees willing to offer honest feedback.

Mike Figliuolo’s favorite part of being a tank platoon leader was taking his men on a tank gunnery exercise. But a new soldier who transferred into his platoon flouted rules, took a sloppy approach and lacked fire in the belly. No amount of yakking helped—but a 7UP did ...

If you tell team members that you welcome their great ideas but never incorporate them, you crush morale. But if you heed group input, you can make everyone feel like winners.

An Arizona technician lost 100 pounds in a weight-loss competition to snag the grand prize: his first skydive. Read about that and other employee wellness initiatives from across the country. They're keeping employees healthy, and helping employers keep health benefits costs down.

Here's a collection of creative employee benefits programs, excerpted from our Compensation & Benefits newsletter: 1. Expectant and new moms get help from co-worker "buddies." 2. Shopping-spree contest helps boost sales, morale. 3. Cash advances help workers dress for success. 4. Employee committees choose company wellness programs. 5. Company pays employees to leave their cars at home. 6. Deployed workers get full pay, benefits and care packages. 7. Medical firm picks reality TV star as its "wellness ambassador." 8. British firm pays for "Botox leave."

There’s been a lot written lately about the demise of humility in our culture. Fortunately, we still have some great examples of successful leaders who demonstrate humility. One of those is the Super Bowl winning former coach of the Indianapolis Colts, Tony Dungy. I’ve admired Tony Dungy for a long time because of his capacity to succeed in the high-stakes competitive environment of the NFL while maintaining grace and humility whether he’s won or lost.

Sometimes it seems like supervisors and employees work in entirely different places. For years, researchers have known that bosses and line workers have widely varying views about things like priorities, performance ratings, communication and benefits. Here are eight areas for which recent studies have revealed major disconnects between what employees want and what their bosses think they want:

One of the most overlooked aspects of leading teams is training them to excel. Just as individuals benefit from professional development, it pays to develop the skills and competencies of your team.

When Fiona MacLeod was tapped to become president of BP Convenience Retail U.S. & Latin America, she rolled out a bold plan that eliminated 9,500 jobs. But she needed those employees—whose jobs were being phased out—to stay motivated over the next 18 months. How did she keep them performing at their peak?

If you ask a sampling of employees to describe the purpose of their jobs or the reason they’re assigned to a project, would you hear the same answer from all of them?
Teams can tell you everything you want to hear, yet when it comes to producing real results, even the most earnest, well-intentioned teams can disappoint.
Many teams operate in name only. The participants dislike one another or lack trust. They may excel in their individual jobs, but as a group they may place self-interest ahead of collaboration.
The traditional approach to motivating employees is to offer rewards if they work harder. Yet many workers won’t pay attention to incentives. What do they want?
As chief executive of a bank with 40,000 employees, Robert Joss realized he couldn’t get to know everyone. But he built working relationships with his 500 midlevel managers.

Move over, Google. Microsoft grabs tech headlines this month by adding zippy new features to its Internet Explorer browser. Here are four cool tricks that will save time for you and your employees.

When managing a team with a negative attitude, hopelessness and futility often set in. You lose patience as people find fault with their teammates, their organization and pretty much everything else. To overhaul a team’s negativity, encourage each member to engage in a bit of self-reflection.

Soon after Gary Lizalek was hired at a Wisconsin medical firm, he informed the company that he believed, as a matter of religious faith, that he was three separate beings. The company fired all three Lizaleks. He sued, saying the company failed to accommodate his religious beliefs.

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