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People Management

With some employees, it isn’t a matter of ability, it’s a matter of attitude. And while you can’t control someone’s horrible personality, you can decide how you’re going to respond. Use these scripts and strategies to confront problem employees and effectively manage employee discipline so you can bring motivating back to the forefront of your workday.

The first rule of people management is not to let one bad apple spoil your whole bunch. Difficult people can put a strain on the productive members of your team.

Make the most of your human capital. Browse our articles on the good, the bad and the ugly of People Management…

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For years, Sheryl Sandberg handled employees’ mistakes by following standard procedure: Identify the key participants, meet with them and assess to what extent they take responsibility for their error. While there’s nothing wrong with that strategy, it has its limits.
Denise Renee Green helps leaders manage their time, boost their efficiency and communicate more forcefully. They often call her the “should police.”
When you’re spending a good part of each day with the same people and working toward common goals, establishing positive relationships raises morale and makes time pass more pleasantly. But should these friendships continue beyond the office when you’re the boss?
Show a genuine interest in what an employee did on her vacation or a few days off to do something special.
James Galton died at age 92 on June 12, 2017. He ran Marvel Comics Group from 1975 to 1991, earning a reputation as a strategic genius and all-around nice guy.
These days it seems anybody could read what they want in just about anything they see. More so, when it comes to Halloween costumes.
Q. I manage people much older than me (I’m 29). They really do know more than me, and they have much deeper industry experience than me. I’ve told them that—and that I don’t have all the answers. But when I say that, they laugh derisively. How can I defer to them without coming across as a softie?
Convert your indifferent or apathetic employees into top performers by following these tips.
Rob Hale, founder and CEO of Quincy, Mass.-based Granite Telecommunications, often insists that his company has the best customer service in the telecommunications industry. He backs it up by setting high standards and educating employees about his favorite measures—and why they matter so much.
If you want to suck the motivation, inspiration, enthusiasm and productivity right out of your staff, follow this advice.
If you want your feedback to matter to employees, avoid these common—but reckless—mistakes.
Change resistance comes in all shapes and sizes, but the most common form is the seemingly innocent phrase “We tried that before, and it didn’t work.” To put an end to this type of change resistance, follow this advice.
If your job involves delivering bad news to employees, the blowback can sting. The simple act of communicating something awful can wreak havoc on your emotions.
Got a new employee on board? Great! Now it’s time to introduce him to the staff. Just don’t make this misstep.
Just as the coach of a losing team can be the force that keeps players giving their all down to the last second of the game, managers have an opportunity to make a significant impact on how their employees perceive times of challenge—even when the company chips are down.
You’ve heard it hundreds of times: Praise employees to reinforce desired action or effort. But there’s a right and wrong way to compliment someone.
While filming “Up in the Air,” Anna Kendrick struggled to maintain her confidence and sense of belonging. In one sentence George Clooney provided reassurance in spades.
To give a truly rousing pep talk that motivates your employees and spurs them to action, researchers Jacqueline and Milton Mayfield at Texas A&M International University say the most successful talks contain these three elements.
If you work with people who possess these characteristics, follow this advice.
Q. I’m amazed by the demands my employees make. It never stops. They want to work from home. They want more time off (one guy requested a three-month sabbatical!). I never expected being a supervisor would require fending off constant outlandish requests. What can I do?
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