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People Management

With some employees, it isn’t a matter of ability, it’s a matter of attitude. And while you can’t control someone’s horrible personality, you can decide how you’re going to respond. Use these scripts and strategies to confront problem employees and effectively manage employee discipline so you can bring motivating back to the forefront of your workday.

The first rule of people management is not to let one bad apple spoil your whole bunch. Difficult people can put a strain on the productive members of your team.

Make the most of your human capital. Browse our articles on the good, the bad and the ugly of People Management…

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Hopefully, reading about multimillion-dollar lawsuit verdicts has motivated you to implement anti-harassment and discrimination employee training. But how good is the training you're giving? It's a question worth asking.
Reason: ...
Leaders have tremendous power to inspire and encourage, but some techniques actually undermine performance. Here’s Samuel Spitalli’s list of 10 no-nos:
As a front-line manager, you can tell firsthand when you've made a good hire or not. Right? Well, it depends. If you're trying to help your enterprise assess its overall "quality of hire"—that is, to measure the effectiveness of its recruiting and staffing strategies—then you need to focus on metrics that capture why you think a new hire is or isn't successful.
Experts can't emphasize enough how important it is for managers to take an active role in helping employees get back to work after injury or illness.
Some people use the words interchangeably, but for most of us the traditional boss is someone who turns employees off, while a leader turns them on. So it's valuable to understand how to be a leader instead of a boss.
If your people feel overworked, does it matter? And what can you do about it? The answers are "yes" and "more than you may think." Some insights and ideas:
When good workers seem to be simply going through the motions, it may be because they're riding on the career merry-go-round—wanting to try something new, but unable to get away from what they're already doing. Here are some questions to ask them:
If your organization does business with any government entity (from a state agency to a local school board), be wary of allowing government officials to become involved in your employee discipline ...
THE LAW. Alternative dispute resolution (ADR) is a less costly way of resolving employment conflicts than going to court Also, good ADR programs often end up being a more peaceful forum ...
Employees who are competent, yet complacent pose a challenge to many front-line managers. Sometimes, it's best (and easiest) to chalk their lack of drive up to personality and leave it at that. But managers need to get their people to work at their full potential.
We've all dealt with office martyrs who choose to do things the hard way. They put in long hours and much labor on simple tasks that could be handled quickly.This sort of game can be a real drag on your team's productivity and morale. Try the following strategies for making your team a martyr-free zone.
As a manager, you need to orient new hires by pointing them toward success and letting them know how to get there. Something this important shouldn't go unplanned. Some basics:
Dan knew that in the long run, working with Andy was a better investment than starting over with a new hire. Here's the strategy he used to coach his promising but undependable worker:
In a recent survey by the Society for Human Resource Management, men ranked work-life balance as a higher priority than did women, and workers younger than age 50 valued it more highly than did baby boomers.
With today's workers feeling the strains caused by higher performance requirements, greater responsibilities, and more frequent downsizings, it's important for managers to be able to identify and deal with burnout.
Issue: Some young, entry-level hires have the attention span of a gnat. How can you possibly train them?
Risk: Failing to properly train rookie employees on the right work habits ...
It's not necessarily a bad reflection on you as a manager when one of your team members starts looking for a new job. This is a situation where your skills can really come to the fore — for the employee, the department, the organization, and yourself. Here are the keys to making the most of this situation:
It's not unusual for workers to resist new responsibilities. Sometimes, what drives this resistance is not fatigue or laziness or resentment, but fear — of change and of failure.
How do you deal with employees who seem to have negative attitudes about every decision you and your teams make? Here's some expert advice:
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