• LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google+

People Management

With some employees, it isn’t a matter of ability, it’s a matter of attitude. And while you can’t control someone’s horrible personality, you can decide how you’re going to respond. Use these scripts and strategies to confront problem employees and effectively manage employee discipline so you can bring motivating back to the forefront of your workday.

The first rule of people management is not to let one bad apple spoil your whole bunch. Difficult people can put a strain on the productive members of your team.

Make the most of your human capital. Browse our articles on the good, the bad and the ugly of People Management…

Page 6 of 69« First...45678...203040...Last »

In 2009, actor Tony Danza decided to spend a year teaching students at a large Philadelphia high school. Predictably, the teacher wound up learning some big lessons.

Long-winded babblers seem incapable of summarizing a point or succinctly addressing an inquiry. Take preventive action to save time and reduce the rambling. 

As a manager, you must hold employees accountable if they abuse workplace policies. Follow this advice.

What they ask, and why.

Many new employees have good ideas to make things better in the workplace. A good boss will coach new employees in suggestion-making, so it’s done in a positive way that doesn’t leave the new employee as an ostracized know-it-all. Here’s what to tell them.

The more you treat people like individuals, the more likely they are to follow your lead.

Good things result when people have friends at the office. But are such pairings good for the company? Consider these pros and cons.

If someone on your team makes a costly mistake, your first instinct might be to shove it aside. You rationalize it by thinking, “It’ll take care of itself in time.” That’s an understandable response.

Workaholics can be overly demanding, expect you to pull the same long hours, or make you feel like you aren’t doing enough—even when you are. If you work with one, follow this advice.

To get past conflict, pick your words carefully. Even with good intentions, you can go astray by adopting an arrogant or hectoring tone.

Q: I’m 56 and I recently hired a 28-year-old. He was about to send out a press release, but I happened to see it first and fixed a sloppy mistake. All he said was, “Good catch.” No apology, no acknowledgement of his error. Overall, he’s a good worker. But if he’s unwilling to take responsibility for his work, how can I supervise him effectively?

Stacey Engle, EVP of Fierce Conversations, offers some tips on how managers can address the personal concerns of employees, while still ensuring top-notch work is being done.

No one wants to believe they are one, but if you exhibit these six signs, you are probably a micromanager.

“I’m glad I didn’t bring him into my office to discuss his declining performance. Employees can get defensive and scared when that happens.”

Dr. Jia Wang, associate professor of human resource development at Texas A&M University, calls workplace incivility a full-blown epidemic. What can you do to rein in incivility and foster a culture of respect and politeness?

This month’s Worst Communicator Award comes courtesy of a colleague who is at her wit’s end with her supervisor.

Managers who understand what employees value have an opportunity to inspire them to find a purpose for their work that they can embrace, and connect to a deeper meaning and increased engagement in their work.

A few years ago I began the habit of getting up earlier and writing in my journal, taking the time to be reflective, appreciative, and grateful. I gradually felt compelled to share these positive and uplifting stories that I had discovered with others. I decided to start by sending a weekly email to the thirty people on my team at Acceleration Partners. The email was originally called “Friday Inspiration,” and I sent it out each Friday morning to the whole company.

When you’re inundated with job applicants, follow this process to quickly pare down all those résumés to the best candidates for the job.

Just as a virus spreads from its host, rudeness at work starts with one “carrier” who acts inappropriately. As co-workers react to a single nasty comment or incident, they are more likely to respond in kind.

Page 6 of 69« First...45678...203040...Last »