People Management skills for all types of managers — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Business Management Daily — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Page 40
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People Management

With some employees, it isn’t a matter of ability, it’s a matter of attitude. And while you can’t control someone’s horrible personality, you can decide how you’re going to respond. Use these scripts and strategies to confront problem employees and effectively manage employee discipline so you can bring motivating back to the forefront of your workday.

The first rule of people management is not to let one bad apple spoil your whole bunch. Difficult people can put a strain on the productive members of your team.

Make the most of your human capital. Browse our articles on the good, the bad and the ugly of People Management…

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While most managers don’t deal directly with ERISA, you may be your company’s “communication voice” for benefits. Warning: Don’t make promises the company isn’t in a position to keep.

If you're relying solely on your memory to evaluate employee performance, you're making appraisals far more difficult than necessary. That's why it's best to institute a simple recording system to document employee performance. The most useful, easy-to-implement way is to create and maintain a log for each person. Follow these six steps:

Sonia, a manager at an insurance company, updates us about her efforts to motivate an employee who seems perpetually bored with his work.
In training seminars, you’ve learned to acknowledge employees’ emotions. You know to say, “I see that you’re …,” and add “angry,” “concerned” or “hurt” to fit the situation. Unfortunately, managers have overdosed on I-feel-your-pain statements.

Set A, B and C goals for your employees’ performance expectations. C goals are Comfortable. B goals are Believable. A goals are Awesome.

Employees are often the best sources of ideas because they are closest to the daily details of the organization. But too often, employees are sitting on great cost-saving, business-generating ideas because they’ve never been specifically asked. Here are five strategies to help encourage their input.

Walmart CEO Mike Duke "is not only a good leader but a really good manager,” says Duke’s predecessor, Lee Scott, who moved Duke into various parts of the business before handing over the reins in 2009.
When an employee experiences the death of a family member or close friend, it’s tempting for supervisors to take a hands-off approach to the em­­ployee’s grief. However, silently waiting for the em­­ployee’s emotional recovery isn’t the best strategy. Take the following four steps to sensitively manage grieving employees and their impact on co-workers.
Negative feedback requires a manager to motivate, counsel and criticize in a way that alerts employees to where the problems lie and what must be done to solve them. Fortunately, it’s a skill that can be learned.

Eric Ryan and Adam Lowry first noticed the need for their company when they shared a house with three friends. In looking for cleaning products that didn’t have harsh, toxic ingredients, Ryan and Lowry came up empty-handed. Thus the idea for Method home-cleaning products was kindled.

Most employees have skills in creativity, collaboration, problem-solving, critical thinking and adaptability. They simply need more. “Brain work is more important than ever,” says Pat Galagan of the American Society for Training and Development.

In your role as a leader, working with people is essential, and it takes time. And sometimes, you might be asked to help with something that’s a priority for others, but not for you. The question, says Peter Bregman, CEO of Bregman Partners, boils down to this: How can we spend time where we add the most value and let go of the rest?

You never appreciate a good performer until you’ve fired a bad performer. That’s because bad performers take so much time and attention to manage. From the moment you sense that an employee isn’t working out—and you set in motion disciplinary steps—you have to imagine a judge and jury watching your every move. That way, you can stand behind your actions without feeling embarrassed or guilty.

The problem: A stellar employee seeks a promotion to a job that demands a fair amount of speaking in front of groups large and small. The trouble is, she stutters. Your first thought: This will not work out. What do you tell her?

Sacred cows are roaming your hallways. They’re grazing on profits, productivity and patience. To round them up and put them out to pasture, you need to be a constant cow hunter. And you need to get your entire team excited about tumbling those herds.

In hiring, use questions or case studies to screen out amoral individuals. In leading, make your value system explicit.
The general might get the credit for his strategy or style. But if you want to win battle after battle—and, ultimately, the war—good sergeants are essential.

Diversity is on the mind of Severin Cabannes, one of three deputy CEOs for Société Générale. The France-based global banking concern is pressing forward on a topic that doesn’t get much play in today’s economy-obsessed world:

People do their best work when they understand how their efforts fit into the big picture. They do better with context.
Executive coach Steve Roesler has heard too many top managers say they rely on 360 assessments to give feedback to middle managers.
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