People Management skills for all types of managers — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Business Management Daily — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Page 3
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People Management

With some employees, it isn’t a matter of ability, it’s a matter of attitude. And while you can’t control someone’s horrible personality, you can decide how you’re going to respond. Use these scripts and strategies to confront problem employees and effectively manage employee discipline so you can bring motivating back to the forefront of your workday.

The first rule of people management is not to let one bad apple spoil your whole bunch. Difficult people can put a strain on the productive members of your team.

Make the most of your human capital. Browse our articles on the good, the bad and the ugly of People Management…

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This month’s Worst Communicator Award comes courtesy of a colleague who is at her wit’s end with her supervisor.

Managers who understand what employees value have an opportunity to inspire them to find a purpose for their work that they can embrace, and connect to a deeper meaning and increased engagement in their work.

A few years ago I began the habit of getting up earlier and writing in my journal, taking the time to be reflective, appreciative, and grateful. I gradually felt compelled to share these positive and uplifting stories that I had discovered with others. I decided to start by sending a weekly email to the thirty people on my team at Acceleration Partners. The email was originally called “Friday Inspiration,” and I sent it out each Friday morning to the whole company.

When you’re inundated with job applicants, follow this process to quickly pare down all those résumés to the best candidates for the job.

Just as a virus spreads from its host, rudeness at work starts with one “carrier” who acts inappropriately. As co-workers react to a single nasty comment or incident, they are more likely to respond in kind.

Your team will perform best when you trust its members to perform on their own. Don’t just hand people a project. Make sure they can positively answer these questions.

For rock climber Tommy Caldwell, leading sometimes involves stepping back and withholding judgment—even when he disapproves of a teammate’s behavior.

HR wears many hats, one of the most important being keeping your organization out of court. An equally important—and related—hat is smoothing out the "people problems" that inevitably arise in any organization. Here's useful advice on how best to solve common employee problems.

You can’t mediate every conflict between employees. You need employees who can manage conflict themselves, so during interviews, ask these questions to determine if job candidates are equipped to do so.

No manager wants to come across as Scrooge, but all of the interruptions to “business as usual” during the holiday season can make any leader not so jolly.

The goal of mediation is to help both sides work out a solution they can live with. Here are some do’s and don’ts to follow when you set up a mediation session.

Good training doesn’t just happen. It’s the result of careful preparation and a well-developed supervisory system.

A progressive discipline system is the best way to correct employee performance problems. It’s also the best way to protect against wrongful termination lawsuits. It allows you to ensure that any employee fired because of inferior performance was treated fairly and in accordance with your company’s policies. Here’s a five-step model for progressive discipline:

Employers of all sizes have increasingly allowed staffers to work from home on a full- or part-time basis. But now some big corporations are changing their mind.

Give more information than your employees may need ... Keep chairs open ... Do a double evaluation

It’s nearly inevitable that you and your team will deal with a change in business strategy, roles or responsibilities at some point. Here are some ways all managers can help their teams remain focused.
Horst Abraham, 94, coaches top athletes. From his experience as a ski instructor, he has noticed that champions focus on their flaws rather than deny them.
An executive at a healthcare company, Adam Rosenfeld found himself supervising a skilled but unhappy staffer, Joan. Despite his efforts, Joan continued to struggle during meetings. An introvert, she often remained too quiet as participants monopolized the floor and derailed the agenda.
Hiring managers need to recruit with care. But when you’re running a startup with global ambitions, every hiring decision can make or break the company.
“Play the long game. Think about whom you’ll need to hire so that when you’re in a pickle, you’ve already contacted those people who can connect you to top candidates.”
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