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People Management

With some employees, it isn’t a matter of ability, it’s a matter of attitude. And while you can’t control someone’s horrible personality, you can decide how you’re going to respond. Use these scripts and strategies to confront problem employees and effectively manage employee discipline so you can bring motivating back to the forefront of your workday.

The first rule of people management is not to let one bad apple spoil your whole bunch. Difficult people can put a strain on the productive members of your team.

Make the most of your human capital. Browse our articles on the good, the bad and the ugly of People Management…

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Q. I don’t have time for ramblers who fail to edit themselves. How do I express to someone that the clock is ticking on my attention span?

Increased workloads … tighter deadlines … fewer resources. All of these have conspired to put a premium on employees’ ability to remain focused on the details of their jobs. Here are five free or low-cost sources designed to measure and improve attention to detail.
Like it or not, your people must be able to adapt to new circumstances. Here are some tips to help you make it easier for your employees to swallow that inevitable change.

Staff look tired and dragging their feet? Here are the causes and cures.

Major problems can erupt when supervisors have to manage people they just don't get along with. Smart managers defuse that tension by focusing on tasks, projects and results—not personalities.
Want to retain more of your top performing employees, increase engagement and productivity, and support their interests and future goals? Introduce your team to career pathing.
Don't pile too much on a talented employee.

If you act one way while angling for a promotion—befriending as many people as you can and acting as if you’re their No. 1 fan—and then abandon them as soon as you’re the boss, you will lose their respect for good. William Shakespeare understood this.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that by 2024 the labor force will grow to about 164 million people. That number includes about 41 million people who will be ages 55 and older—of whom about 13 million are expected to be ages 65 and older.
You encourage teamwork among your staff, but no amount of preaching will help if certain workers relish their independence, bear grudges against co-workers or fear being left out when it’s time to roll the credits. To win them over, meet with them privately and ask four questions.

Truly empathetic listeners have a high tolerance for absorbing others’ sadness and emotional struggles. Do you possess a high degree of empathy? Answer these three questions.

If your company doesn’t have much of a written dress code, you still need to address those whose attire crosses the careless and inappropriate line. You’ll know it when you see it. Here’s how to handle it.

Avoid these critical mistakes when you delegate work to team members.

When an employee goes out of his or her way to please you, resist the urge to respond in a positive way. Follow this advice.

Surveys consistently show that lack of trust in management is one of the main reasons employees disengage from their work and seek jobs elsewhere. Here are 10 ways managers can work to earn trust from their employees.

Q: We had a superstar here who quit because she couldn’t take the C-suite’s bad decision-making anymore. Now since I’m fairly high up the ladder, several people are asking me what happened. How much honesty can I afford here?

Negative people in the workplace zap energy and productivity. Leadership expert Dan Rockwell offers these tips for dealing with three very specific types of negative people.

When an argument breaks out during a meeting, work through it with this advice.

As I write this, the local pro football team is engaged in a familiar dance with an emerging star: Management wants to pay him a certain crazy number of millions of dollars per year, but his agent would like just a smidgen of an increase over that already astronomical amount, thank you very much, or the man with the golden arm walks. How many times have you shaken your head over the greed displayed in a situation like this? But if you were that football player, you’d likely make a similar demand.

Q. I’m quite well paid and it’s obvious to everyone at my company. But I’m in charge of motivating a lot of very low-paid employees. I’m not sensing their trust—I think the income disparity is a real problem. What do you recommend?

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