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People Management

With some employees, it isn’t a matter of ability, it’s a matter of attitude. And while you can’t control someone’s horrible personality, you can decide how you’re going to respond. Use these scripts and strategies to confront problem employees and effectively manage employee discipline so you can bring motivating back to the forefront of your workday.

The first rule of people management is not to let one bad apple spoil your whole bunch. Difficult people can put a strain on the productive members of your team.

Make the most of your human capital. Browse our articles on the good, the bad and the ugly of People Management…

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A quick summary of a recent training webinar presented by Business Management Daily.
Delegating work may feel daunting, but when done correctly, it can lower risk in your business, writes Elizabeth Grace Saunders, CEO of Real Life E. Here’s how to get over the fear of delegating.
At Zingerman’s Roadhouse, a popular Michigan restaurant, the weekly sales figures are not a big secret. All 50 em­­ployees gather to discuss the results—and brainstorm on how they can help each other exceed those numbers in the week ahead.
When you think of troublesome types, the social butterflies in your office might not come to mind. After all, their friendly, bubbly natures liven up the workplace. Still, they can cause some problems.
Don't let fear and worry derail your projects just as they are beginning. Create a “worry list” the next time your team takes on a new task or project.
What do you do when employees’ personal issues are affecting their work performance? While understandably you may not want to discuss personal issues with employees, you can’t ignore them.
If fears of up to half of your best workers packing up and leaving aren’t keeping you awake at night—maybe they should be. You should be talking to your best workers to discover how to keep them aboard.
When David Cote became Honeywell’s CEO in 2002, it was in disarray. And so he listed 12 behaviors that he wanted everyone to follow. He felt that unifying the company around the be­­haviors would work better than articulating vague, hard-to-measure values.

The hole left when an outstanding employee departs can seem big enough to swallow up the productivity of that person’s whole department. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Here are four tips to maintain order and productivity when a top employee moves on

Positivity is what keeps a workplace ticking. It all starts with supervisors. And all they have to do is treat employees better.
In fielding highly charged emotional statements, your first goal is understanding and clarification. Your second is conveying that you care.

How can you hire people with a great attitude? Start by discovering what motivates them. Identify what they value and tailor the job accordingly.

When a technology manager at Goldman Sachs moved to HR, questioning her staff was suddenly labeled as "interrogating." Why?

They have a power that the most skilled managers know how to harness. Want your words to actually resonate with employees? Try posing one very telling question to each member of your team.
Graveyard-shift work is growing rapidly, among both white-and blue-collar jobs and in all industries, and on teams whose managers supervise both day-and night-shift workers. Some tips:
You can’t just hire the types of people you want: people who are willing to go beyond your expectations, who plan to stay with your organization for the long term, and who will recommend your organization and its leaders to others. You must create the conditions to nurture those characteristics.
Follow the “1% rule” when dealing with upset employees—especially if you’re the target. The rule: At least 1% of what angry employees say is accurate, regardless of how much they generalize.
One employee does a terrific job but is needy with a capital N—frequently visiting your office for heart-to-hearts about a slew of worries. Your challenge is to give the staffer adequate guidance without letting the person monopolize your time.
Kathleen Brush, a 25-year veteran of international business and author of The Power of One: You’re the Boss, warns managers at all levels to avoid being one of these terrible bosses:
After you've mastered making a good impression, don't forget how to build rapport and alliances with co-workers.
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