People Management skills for all types of managers — Page 2
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People Management

With some employees, it isn’t a matter of ability, it’s a matter of attitude. And while you can’t control someone’s horrible personality, you can decide how you’re going to respond. Use these scripts and strategies to confront problem employees and effectively manage employee discipline so you can bring motivating back to the forefront of your workday.

The first rule of people management is not to let one bad apple spoil your whole bunch. Difficult people can put a strain on the productive members of your team.

Make the most of your human capital. Browse our articles on the good, the bad and the ugly of People Management…

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Make a point this year to invest time in coaching your employees to both improve performance and take it to the next level. Follow these tips.

According to a recent Harris Poll Interactive Survey, 69% of managers dislike communicating with staff. Here’s how you can dramatically improve in providing clear expectations and meaningful feedback.

When your team experiences a big setback or outright failure, they’ll undoubtedly feel disappointed. Don’t ignore it. Instead, gather your team to reflect on the situation so you can move forward.

Q. The nature of our business is up and down. All the volatility makes it fun for me, but some members of our team aren’t very good at handling the uncertainty. They get frazzled and don’t deal well with sudden lulls and surges in activity. Are there ways to help people take volatility in stride?

Q. One of my employees is paranoid. He talks about how the company spies on everyone, uses hidden cameras in the restroom, eavesdrops on us, monitors our online usage, etc. I keep assuring him he’s full of it, but he replies, “You’re just a supervisor. This is above your pay grade.” How can I convince him to stop all the nonsense?

With some employees, the problem isn't a matter of ability, it's a matter of attitude. This can manifest itself in everything from quiet disobedience to outright insubordination. How should you respond?

In 2009, actor Tony Danza decided to spend a year teaching students at a large Philadelphia high school. Predictably, the teacher wound up learning some big lessons.

Long-winded babblers seem incapable of summarizing a point or succinctly addressing an inquiry. Take preventive action to save time and reduce the rambling. 

As a manager, you must hold employees accountable if they abuse workplace policies. Follow this advice.

What they ask, and why.

Many new employees have good ideas to make things better in the workplace. A good boss will coach new employees in suggestion-making, so it’s done in a positive way that doesn’t leave the new employee as an ostracized know-it-all. Here’s what to tell them.

The more you treat people like individuals, the more likely they are to follow your lead.

Good things result when people have friends at the office. But are such pairings good for the company? Consider these pros and cons.

If someone on your team makes a costly mistake, your first instinct might be to shove it aside. You rationalize it by thinking, “It’ll take care of itself in time.” That’s an understandable response.

Workaholics can be overly demanding, expect you to pull the same long hours, or make you feel like you aren’t doing enough—even when you are. If you work with one, follow this advice.

To get past conflict, pick your words carefully. Even with good intentions, you can go astray by adopting an arrogant or hectoring tone.

Q: I’m 56 and I recently hired a 28-year-old. He was about to send out a press release, but I happened to see it first and fixed a sloppy mistake. All he said was, “Good catch.” No apology, no acknowledgement of his error. Overall, he’s a good worker. But if he’s unwilling to take responsibility for his work, how can I supervise him effectively?

Stacey Engle, EVP of Fierce Conversations, offers some tips on how managers can address the personal concerns of employees, while still ensuring top-notch work is being done.

No one wants to believe they are one, but if you exhibit these six signs, you are probably a micromanager.

“I’m glad I didn’t bring him into my office to discuss his declining performance. Employees can get defensive and scared when that happens.”

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