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People Management

With some employees, it isn’t a matter of ability, it’s a matter of attitude. And while you can’t control someone’s horrible personality, you can decide how you’re going to respond. Use these scripts and strategies to confront problem employees and effectively manage employee discipline so you can bring motivating back to the forefront of your workday.

The first rule of people management is not to let one bad apple spoil your whole bunch. Difficult people can put a strain on the productive members of your team.

Make the most of your human capital. Browse our articles on the good, the bad and the ugly of People Management…

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Effective leaders often say that they won’t shoot the messenger. They just want the unvarnished truth.
What should you do when your best performer is a terrible teammate?
If you want to become a thought leader in your industry, you need to push out high-value content on a frequent basis. But how do you find the time or manpower to generate all that content?
When you jump headfirst into a new job, it’s not uncommon to want to be as helpful as possible.

Errors slow productivity and frustrate everyone. So it’s tempting to chastise or terminate employees who repeatedly make mistakes. But don’t be so quick with that trigger finger.

Jay Forte, president of The Greatness Zone, LLC and author of Fire Up Your Employees, called attention during his February webinar to several culture mistakes your organization needs to avoid.
Here are three of the hardest personality types you’ll come across at work—and how to manage them.
Many people hide their feelings out of anger, fear or uncertainty. So a manager needs to have his or her radar up when an employee says one thing and thinks or does another.
So, you have a perfectly functional workplace where things are getting done adequately—but the office has become one of those too-quiet places where you can drop a dime on the carpet and hear it echo up and down the hallway.
A “written warning” is usually a key step in the process of progressive discipline. It’s purpose, of course, is to effect a change in behavior. But how do you write one?
When an aspiring diva is oversharing vivid details of her latest marital crisis, loudly lamenting a new company policy, or turning the search for a lost document into a Mission Impossible-style hunt, the one thing she isn’t doing is her job.
Retired Lt. Gen. Frank Kearney was deputy commander for the U.S. Special Operations Command. The three-star general helped oversee 62,000 people with a $10 billion budget.
It’s important to be able to trust the people you work with day in and day out. It can, however, be hard to communicate this trustworthiness to others.
When more than one employee is implicated in a rule violation, make sure all employees are disciplined equally. That’s especially true if they have the same supervisors and similar disciplinary histories.
No state or federal law requires you to establish a progressive discipline policy. If your organization has one, however, make sure all your supervisors understand and follow it.
What if you made your organization's mission statement into something more like a pre-game locker room speech?
As CEO of Cleveland Clinic, Delos “Toby” Cosgrove had earned a sterling reputation as a longtime leader in the health care field. After gaining international fame as a pioneering heart surgeon, Cosgrove took the top job at the prestigious Cleveland Clinic in 2004.
No state has passed a law that outright bans bullying at work, and only one has come close. Yet don't let that stop you from forging ahead with your own anti-bullying program.
In the three and a half years that Marissa Mayer has run Yahoo, many of her key executives have quit. In October 2015, Mayer implied that those who left Yahoo lacked certain skills.
If you ask Doug Tieman to describe his leadership style, he’ll give you two answers. When he wants to inspire employees to excel, he sees himself as a cheerleader. But when crises erupt and he seeks to reassure an anxious workforce, he acts like a mule skinner.
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