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Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

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Q. I don’t have time for ramblers who fail to edit themselves. How do I express to someone that the clock is ticking on my attention span?

Increased workloads … tighter deadlines … fewer resources. All of these have conspired to put a premium on employees’ ability to remain focused on the details of their jobs. Here are five free or low-cost sources designed to measure and improve attention to detail.
Like it or not, your people must be able to adapt to new circumstances. Here are some tips to help you make it easier for your employees to swallow that inevitable change.
Need a quick jolt of leadership adrenaline? Check out these stories of four famous people who came within a whisker of losing it all ... or never making it big in the first place.
The résumé of Kevin Turner, who spent 11 years as chief operating officer of Microsoft, didn’t really mesh with the demands of the world of hedge fund Citadel. And he became an example of a leader who can’t necessarily walk into the boardroom of his choice and dazzle in a different culture.
Here are three ways to build an online identity.

Staff look tired and dragging their feet? Here are the causes and cures.

Major problems can erupt when supervisors have to manage people they just don't get along with. Smart managers defuse that tension by focusing on tasks, projects and results—not personalities.
Want to retain more of your top performing employees, increase engagement and productivity, and support their interests and future goals? Introduce your team to career pathing.
Don't pile too much on a talented employee.
“We must declare a worldwide ban on the phrase ‘constructive criticism’; it’s a true oxymoron,” argues Dr. Tim Irwin.

In the late 1970s, Richard Fain was stuck on a sinking ship, cargo shipping company Gotaas-Larsen Shipping. Rather than play defense, Fain proposed that the board of directors authorize a major investment in new ships.

Humanity is not just a feel-good concept; it sells

In the pre-dawn darkness of a May morning in 1970, a sleepless Richard Nixon asked his valet, Manolo Sanchez, if he’d ever seen the Lincoln Memorial. Nixon told him to get dressed, because that’s where they were headed. Some young protesters were stunned to see the President approach.
Many organizations around the world use development plans to document their employees' development goals by itemizing the skills they need to improve and the learning activities they should undertake. In theory this is an honorable effort, but in practice, at most organizations development plans have become just another bureaucratic exercise that consumes time and effort without producing the desired results.
You’ve been approached to be on a board. You are flattered! But, should you accept? There is a lot to consider as you weigh the time, personal investment, and—at times—risk. Cheryl Hyatt of Hyatt-Fennell Executive Search has five tips for evaluating a board position to make sure it’s right for you.
To feel more free and fearless, try a purge. Feel free to go out someday and re-acquire the things you really want, but just experience for once how a dramatic purge makes you lighter and emboldens you to simplify in other areas.

If you act one way while angling for a promotion—befriending as many people as you can and acting as if you’re their No. 1 fan—and then abandon them as soon as you’re the boss, you will lose their respect for good. William Shakespeare understood this.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that by 2024 the labor force will grow to about 164 million people. That number includes about 41 million people who will be ages 55 and older—of whom about 13 million are expected to be ages 65 and older.
You encourage teamwork among your staff, but no amount of preaching will help if certain workers relish their independence, bear grudges against co-workers or fear being left out when it’s time to roll the credits. To win them over, meet with them privately and ask four questions.
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