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Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

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You can’t mediate every conflict between employees. You need employees who can manage conflict themselves, so during interviews, ask these questions to determine if job candidates are equipped to do so.

No manager wants to come across as Scrooge, but all of the interruptions to “business as usual” during the holiday season can make any leader not so jolly.

Think emojis aren’t very important in the grand scheme of things? Consider Jessica Morrison’s view of them. She’s editor of Chemical and Engineering News and co-author of a plan to introduce nine new science-themed emojis to the existing 1300 Unicode-approved characters we all know better day after day.

Suggest a team-building exercise and employees may groan. However, here are two activities that even your most cynical employees will find valuable.

The goal of mediation is to help both sides work out a solution they can live with. Here are some do’s and don’ts to follow when you set up a mediation session.

Abandoning the “aces in their places” strategy where individuals were limited to specialized roles, restaurant manager Robert Conrad enabled everyone to learn from each other and become proficient in a wider range of jobs.

Minnesota Twins manager Ron Gardenhire’s willingness to admit error shows that fallibility and leadership go hand-in-hand.

Ryan Cohen and his business partner decided to sell their jewelry inventory at a loss to try to corner the market on pet parents. The result was Chewy.com. Silicon Valley wasn’t that interested in parting with startup money at first, but the company is now valued at around $4 billion.

Good training doesn’t just happen. It’s the result of careful preparation and a well-developed supervisory system.

Michael Houlihan didn’t intend to launch a wine company. It all started by happenstance.

Work-related disengagement and stress cost U.S. businesses hundreds of billions a year. As a leader, you need to model behavior that prevents disengagement and dissipates stress.

When Jennifer Cue left as CEO of Jones Soda Co. in 2006, she figured she could raise a family with the satisfaction of knowing she had positioned the beverage firm for years of steady growth. She was wrong.

A progressive discipline system is the best way to correct employee performance problems. It’s also the best way to protect against wrongful termination lawsuits. It allows you to ensure that any employee fired because of inferior performance was treated fairly and in accordance with your company’s policies. Here’s a five-step model for progressive discipline:

As you mingle before delivering a speech, use that time to win over audience members. Help them form a positive first impression of you.

Deciding is a process, not an event, so use that process to learn. Here are some benefits, risks and challenges.
Q. I volunteered to serve on a committee to boost my visibility here. But I keep getting assigned time-consuming projects on top of my normal job. The projects aren’t very interesting, and it feels like the committee chair is just dumping chores on my lap. Should I quit this stupid committee?
Employers of all sizes have increasingly allowed staffers to work from home on a full- or part-time basis. But now some big corporations are changing their mind.

Q. For years, I reported to the CEO. But the company brought in someone just below the CEO level, so now I report to this new manager who’s terrible. I rely on my new boss to get a sense of the CEO’s priorities, but after he comes out of meetings with the CEO, he’s vague about what’s next. Plus, he takes credit for my ideas. How would you handle this?

Give more information than your employees may need ... Keep chairs open ... Do a double evaluation

Serial entrepreneur Rohit Mehrotra owns one of the fastest-growing tech services companies in America. Asked what wisdom he would share with future leaders, aside from a strong ethical compass, he said this.
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