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Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

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To give a truly rousing pep talk that motivates your employees and spurs them to action, researchers Jacqueline and Milton Mayfield at Texas A&M International University say the most successful talks contain these three elements.
No matter how busy or rushed you are, you should never forgo proofing your message. Before you share that document, email or other content, follow these proofreading hacks.
If you work with people who possess these characteristics, follow this advice.
Mike Massimino desperately wanted to become an astronaut. So the 30-year-old applied to NASA and hoped for the best. But as time passed and he didn’t hear back, he obtained his file. What he discovered alarmed him.
Q. I’m amazed by the demands my employees make. It never stops. They want to work from home. They want more time off (one guy requested a three-month sabbatical!). I never expected being a supervisor would require fending off constant outlandish requests. What can I do?
If you want to be ultra-productive, start each day with a written plan.
Employees who make a point of being at work every day are a manager’s dream, right? Not so fast. Beware the cost of employees who never take a day off despite being ill.
In February 1985, Ida Cole joined Microsoft as one of its first female vice presidents. Within months, her relationship with the mercurial Bill Gates worsened. His confrontational style created a tense workplace.
Being negative solves nothing—and more often than not, it causes people to shut down and disengage, says Jon Gordon, author of The Power of Positive Leadership.
The day of the aggressive know-it-all who steamrolls over colleagues is drawing to a close. In the future, success will belong to those who can quiet their egos, collaborate, and empathize with others.
“Despite my pressing them repeatedly to tell me why this had occurred, I never got anywhere and they stopped returning my calls... [T]wo days later I was on a plane to Tokyo to meet with the partner.”
Be honest, if your employees were asked these questions, what would their answers say about your leadership?
Your days are indeed dotted with small promises and commitments to your employees: from "I'll stop by this afternoon to give you a hand" to "drop by my office later and we'll talk about that." Here are some tips on how to keep your word.
Q. I’ve been a midmanager here for 10 years. Recently, I got a new boss who’s decades younger than me, and I’m suddenly an outcast. I’ve been treated terribly by this person, even though I’ve been supportive and made his job easier. When I asked what gives, he said, “You have to prove your relevance to me.” Outrageous!
Given the “anything goes” times we’re living in where people share far too much online, here is your annual reminder of things you should not discuss at work.
Larry Light, co-author with Joan Kiddon of Six Rules for Brand Revitalization, identifies some tips on how businesses can avoid making a mess of their brands.
Here at Communication Briefings, we often discourage you from using the latest buzzwords and jargon because they cause confusion and misunderstandings. That said, if you are going to use them, at least, make sure you are using them correctly.
Finding qualified candidates requires an investment of time, energy and money from all involved in your organization’s recruitment, hiring and training functions—but your role as a manager doesn’t really begin until after employees have completed their new-hire paperwork.
As a young manager at Johnson & Johnson, Jim Burke developed a therapeutic chest rub for children. The product launched to great fanfare—and failed miserably.
Most of us wait to end our time at a job, or our careers, until we absolutely must go. But once in a while, it’s worth imagining what it would be like to depart in midstride.
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