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Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

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As a teenager, IBM executive Patrick Tambor and his band mates practiced at his house. Overhearing them discussing whether they should forgo college and pursue their music, Tambor’s father decided to get involved.
Revolutionary firebrand Ethan Allen was so charismatic that his guards on a British prison ship slipped him the captain’s leftover food and helped him adjust his leg irons (while guarding him, day and night, with fixed bayonets).
One of the worst things you can realize as a manager is that you have promoted someone you shouldn’t have. Here’s how to prevent promoting an employee to a position that he's not ready for.
In the 1970s, David Rockefeller ran Chase Manhattan Bank. His longtime public affairs aide, Fraser Seitel, helped draft the CEO’s speeches. In the nearly 50 years that Seitel worked for Rockefeller, he only ticked off his boss once.
Many otherwise strong leaders have a glaring weakness: They buckle under pressure. To withstand pressure, you need to adopt the right attitude. Here are three keys to persevering when it counts.
“As a leader, you have to define your values in a strong, clear way... It’s important that everyone from the people in the billing department to senior executives is clear about the values-based principles that unite us.”
Many supervisors are sensitive about rating their people on the basis of a generalized standard or in terms of a numerical scale. Use these tips offered by Elwood N. Chapman in his book, Supervisor’s Survival Kit, to decide on ratings that accurately and fairly reflect workers’ performance.
In November 2011, JC Penney hired Ron Johnson as its CEO. At the time, Johnson was considered a bold hire. But his star faded fast. Within 17 months, Penney ousted him after the company lost $4 billion in revenue and its stock tanked.
After Mark Bonfigli and four colleagues co-founded Dealer.com in 1998, they poured their heart and soul into the startup. And they paid the price. They drove themselves so hard that they became ill.
Q: I keep getting grief from my board for not developing my managers, but there are only so many priorities that I can address at once. How can I satisfy the board without dropping the ball on some other top priority?
What do employees want most from leaders? A study published in the Harvard Business Review says it boils down to one thing: respect.
Q. My boss told me I’m a weak manager—that I’m too humble, that I defer to others, dither rather than make quick, decisive decisions and I’m too eager to apologize. To me, that’s the kind of humility great leaders embody. Am I right?
Exhausted young guns on Wall Street have learned what the rest of America is finding out: Sacrificing your life to your job may not be worth it.
This month’s award for Best Communicator goes to Ben Congleton, founder and CEO of Olark for showing what real empathy and support looks like.
Whether they give a pat on the back or a kick in the butt, great managers reward and recognize their people quickly. Don’t underestimate the power of recognition and the effectiveness of feedback, both positive and negative. Here are three recognition disciplines that will help.
How to give employees work/life balance and keep the workplace productive.
How can ordinary people perform effectively in complex and dangerous situations?
Here are five signs that employees are ready to climb the ladder.
It’s hard enough motivating a white-collar workforce. Imagine trying to motivate garbage collectors.
Martyrs are willing to take things on and sacrifice for the team—and boy, do they let everyone else know it. While on the surface, such employees seem like a dream, they can be problematic. Here’s how.
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