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Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

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The more you treat people like individuals, the more likely they are to follow your lead.

You see it in business, sports and government: Almost everyone acknowledges that an organization’s culture is essential to its success. To help you see your team’s cultural value proposition in practical terms, break it down into these four practices.

Good things result when people have friends at the office. But are such pairings good for the company? Consider these pros and cons.

“Meditation allows you to get in touch with who you are as a human being and gives you the power to choose how you respond to any situation.”

Innovation sputters when fear runs rampant. Managers may hype the importance of taking risks, only to chastise those who embark on bold but costly experiments.

If someone on your team makes a costly mistake, your first instinct might be to shove it aside. You rationalize it by thinking, “It’ll take care of itself in time.” That’s an understandable response.

Workaholics can be overly demanding, expect you to pull the same long hours, or make you feel like you aren’t doing enough—even when you are. If you work with one, follow this advice.

To get past conflict, pick your words carefully. Even with good intentions, you can go astray by adopting an arrogant or hectoring tone.

If you’re a business leader, keep an eye on @JohnLegere and other leaders who have chosen to risk backlash by speaking bluntly on social media and putting their faces and words front and center of the company’s public persona.

Andrew Makar is all too familiar with project management challenges. An information technology consultant, he has learned how to avoid potholes and stay on track.

Q: Our CEO is always telling us to be more open about our failures. He wants us to innovate, and he knows that means some botched experiments. But the few of us who have taken high-profile risks have not been lauded; in fact, he’s privately (and publicly) shamed and embarrassed us. Is there a polite way to call someone a hypocrite?

Q: I’m 56 and I recently hired a 28-year-old. He was about to send out a press release, but I happened to see it first and fixed a sloppy mistake. All he said was, “Good catch.” No apology, no acknowledgement of his error. Overall, he’s a good worker. But if he’s unwilling to take responsibility for his work, how can I supervise him effectively?

Stacey Engle, EVP of Fierce Conversations, offers some tips on how managers can address the personal concerns of employees, while still ensuring top-notch work is being done.

When he was 16, Frank Ntilikina asked Michael Jordan for the key to his success, and Jordan told the aspiring NBA player the most amazing thing he’d ever heard. 

No one wants to believe they are one, but if you exhibit these six signs, you are probably a micromanager.

Somewhere out there are true individuals who are just fine engaging in group or “significant other” activities all by themselves, completely comfortable no matter who’s looking at them quizzically. Become that type of person and you’ve reached a plateau of self-confidence few ever will.

“I’m glad I didn’t bring him into my office to discuss his declining performance. Employees can get defensive and scared when that happens.”

Asked how he convinced his friend Warren Buffett to turn over most of his billions in an enormous donation to the Gates Foundation years ago, software pioneer Bill Gates said he never brought it up.

Dr. Jia Wang, associate professor of human resource development at Texas A&M University, calls workplace incivility a full-blown epidemic. What can you do to rein in incivility and foster a culture of respect and politeness?

“I told them, ‘You’ve created a successful business after breaking away from another firm. I find that inspirational. I want that same story. And I can’t do this without your support.’”

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