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Management Training

Management training isn’t just for newbies and novices – managers and supervisors of all levels and all ages need actionable management practices to bring to their department, division or company. Learn how to be the best boss you can be by expanding your management skills, managing change effectively and bring strong leadership into your everyday management practices.

One important way to judge your success as a manger is by the success of your employees. An effective manager isn’t just a boss who can extract the most productivity from his people, but the one who produces great future managers. How can you be sure that under your leadership managers will blossom?

Start your management training program here with our articles, tools, self-tests, and training sessions…

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Q. I manage seven people in a low-profile, almost forgotten unit. I have a chance at a job in a growing department, but it’s a non-managerial position. Is it wise to give up my management duties for a job in a more visible and active part of the company?
Q. I work for a manager who comes in at 7:45 and leaves at 4:30 sharp whenever he is here (which is not often), and he takes an hour lunch. He hogs the credit for our work, and he avoids responsibility.
Only the most naive employees still believe that they’ll rise to the top on pure merit. Getting ahead requires a mix of political savvy, street-smart aggressiveness and common sense.
Men are stronger at business analysis and strategic planning and women are more results-driven, according to a recent study of North American managers.
When interviewing for a job, don’t dwell on why you left your last position.
Moods come and go, in yourself and others, but that doesn’t make you a helpless bystander. Without fanfare, you can control your own attitudes and handle fluctuating moods in your bosses and employees.
A federal district court in Minnesota recently decided that menopause is not a disability covered under ADA.
Most time-management books coach readers to set priorities and make lists. Jeffrey J. Mayer digs a bit deeper and offers more substantive advice on organizing your workday—and your attitude.
When U.S. Commerce Secretary Ron Brown and some senior executives died in a plane crash a few years ago, I remember thinking, “Those CEOs better have good succession plans.”
The way you prepare a budget for your department reveals much about both your work habits and outlook. By tracking variables with care and making sound assumptions, you can impress higher-ups with your number-crunching prowess. But if you allocate resources poorly or permit too much flab, you can lose credibility.
Q. I find that co-workers and even a few bosses are forming a negative perception of my abilities, after a period when they seemed perfectly happy with my contribution.
Jack Stack is the president and CEO of SRC Holdings Corp. in Springfield, Mo., a rapidly growing industrial firm with 1,200 employees and $140 million in revenues. Stack came to SRC in 1979 as a plant manager of International Harvester after 11 years of management experience.

Q. I’m fed up with waiting six months for a great performance review, only to get a measly little raise. This has gone on for four years. What can I do to break this cycle?

Most management experts warn against meddling in your employees’ every decision. That advice isn’t always right. While controlling supervisors can turn their bold innovators into pliant order-takers, there are times when micromanaging makes sense.
Senior executives at large companies often attend intensive advanced management programs through local universities. Aside from the actual knowledge that they pick up in these courses, the participants usually find that the real value comes from getting to know other business people in entirely different industries.
Ever wonder why some managers create a harmonious, warm atmosphere while others operate in a snake pit?
When you’re about to turn in a major report or make an ambitious proposal to senior management, rally support first.
Larry Stupski served as vice chairman of Charles Schwab & Co., a discount brokerage firm known for its innovative products and service. Now retired, Stupski is chairman of Jobs for California Graduates, a nonprofit mentoring program for disadvantaged youth. Stupski is living proof that it pays to find a wise, insightful guide to help you sharpen your skills and chart a successful career path.
Before you sign a contract with a vendor or supplier, draft a separate “expectation management” sheet.
Many business owners worry about sharing too much information with employees. But the secret of communicating financial data with your team is to track profit and loss while also teaching them to read a balance sheet.
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