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Management Training

Management training isn’t just for newbies and novices – managers and supervisors of all levels and all ages need actionable management practices to bring to their department, division or company. Learn how to be the best boss you can be by expanding your management skills, managing change effectively and bring strong leadership into your everyday management practices.

One important way to judge your success as a manger is by the success of your employees. An effective manager isn’t just a boss who can extract the most productivity from his people, but the one who produces great future managers. How can you be sure that under your leadership managers will blossom?

Start your management training program here with our articles, tools, self-tests, and training sessions…

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When you claw your way ahead, you’ve got to act like you’re above it all. You can’t let on that you care what your co-workers say about you or do to you. Radiate a low-key intensity so that people underestimate you rather than root for you to fall on your face.
Q. There’s a professional designation that some people in my industry earn to win promotions into upper management. But it’s a two-year commitment and I’m not sure I need it to move up. Should I bother?
Q. I’ve worked here one year, and I’m struck by the poor quality of management. Is this enough of a reason to leave?
When interviewing for a job, determine whether the hiring manager cares more about “hard” qualifications, such as your technical experience, or “soft” skills, such as your work ethic.
In job interviews, you can look candidates in the eye and weigh whether they’d fit at your firm. But that’s hardly a foolproof way to measure integrity.
Fred Abrew, 62, became CEO at Equitable Resources Inc., a Pennsylvania utility company, after nearly 40 years of climbing the corporate ladder. He served as CEO for three years, leaving in 1997 with a “golden parachute” worth $1.35 million. We spoke with Abrew about his steady ascent to the top:
That’s right—get rid of that silly box.
Coach employees using the Purpose-Ask-Reach agreement approach.
Change never lets up. And convincing your staff to embrace constant change keeps getting tougher.
Q. Nine months ago, I took a smaller raise in return for a promise that I’d get better, higher-profile assignments. I was told that I could rise faster by proving myself in high-visibility jobs, so I agreed to forgo money for long-term gain. I’m still waiting for the chance to step out and get more exposure. How long should I wait?
Every day, 2.2 million e-mails get sent. Many of them never get read.
Q. I’m 54 and feeling marginalized. Most newcomers are 20 years younger than me and they seem to get all the attention. They get invited to management meetings and get treated more seriously, despite my seniority. Am I being paranoid?
Beware of “running out the clock” on the statute of limitations of a discrimination charge.
You want to encourage teamwork, so you organize employees in small groups and let them solve problems. That’s not enough. You must take steps to foster trust and collaboration if you really want your participants to produce outstanding results.
An employee quits, and you instantly shift your focus to finding a replacement. That’s fine, as long as you don’t overlook the exit interview.
One of the most important but vastly overlooked aspects of good management is telling employees how they’re doing. Many workers operate in the dark, wondering whether the boss loves or hates them.
Jerry Colangelo, owner of the Phoenix Suns and Arizona Diamondbacks, runs businesses that employ more than 5,000 people. His employees have ranged from basketball stars such as Charles Barkley to part-timers at ballpark concession stands. We spoke with Colangelo about his management philosophy and the lessons he has learned after 33 years in the business of pro sports.
In the past five years, many managers have adopted “open-book management” as a way to teach employees to link their jobs to the company’s larger financial performance. This way, staffers can see how their efforts directly affect the bottom line.
Resist the hype to embrace online training for your employees.
Q. I manage seven people in a low-profile, almost forgotten unit. I have a chance at a job in a growing department, but it’s a non-managerial position. Is it wise to give up my management duties for a job in a more visible and active part of the company?
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