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Management Training

Management training isn’t just for newbies and novices – managers and supervisors of all levels and all ages need actionable management practices to bring to their department, division or company. Learn how to be the best boss you can be by expanding your management skills, managing change effectively and bring strong leadership into your everyday management practices.

One important way to judge your success as a manger is by the success of your employees. An effective manager isn’t just a boss who can extract the most productivity from his people, but the one who produces great future managers. How can you be sure that under your leadership managers will blossom?

Start your management training program here with our articles, tools, self-tests, and training sessions…

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Elizabeth Smith got hit with a double whammy: a harassing boss and a company that didn't take it seriously. In the end, the company's lax response cost it big-time ...
Protect your organization from employee lawsuits for harassment by focusing your attention on both preventive and corrective measures. Provide every employee ...
Most management books say you should model the behavior you want from your employees. That’s good advice—sometimes.
Getting ahead requires getting attention. But trying too hard to trumpet your greatness can backfire. Walk a fine line by quietly promoting yourself: Serve as a press contact.
Consider your audience before you resort to trendy management terms.
The lessons of Lynne McClure's book, Risky Business, on violence in the workplace.
To be a better manager, try these tips:
Investigating the reasons behind the seemingly sudden firing of a competent colleague
Charles Harwood spent 10 years as president of N.V. Philips’ integrated circuit company in America. In this interview Harwood, now retired, shares his insights into getting ahead.
You observe an employee loafing or overhear two workers making snide comments about the company. Beware of retaliating by ignoring them in meetings or dismissing their work.
Charles Harwood spent 10 years as president of N.V. Philips’ integrated circuit company in America. Under his watch, the division’s annual sales reached $700 million and it built up to 10,000 employees.

Q. I’ve had the same boss for seven years. It has been a decent relationship, but lately he’s acting weird. He snaps more easily, finds fault with my work and nags me relentlessly. What should I do?

When setbacks occur, all eyes turn to you for leadership. Deep down, you’re panicking. But on the outside you’re tough as nails.
With the recent rash of shootings in America’s offices, it’s more important than ever to spot dangerous behaviors in co-workers.
You’re tired of hiring consultants to train your staff. You want your employees to learn about change management, teamwork and communication skills by doing—not sitting and listening to “experts” lecture about it.
Don’t feel you must be sneaky when checking e-mail or computer files.
You’re a manager, not a salesperson. But that shouldn’t stop you from applying tricks of the sales trade to sharpen your management style.
I knew a guy with a great résumé. He had technical expertise, a nice mix of job experiences and a steady work history. He interviewed well, too.
Smart managers may give employees a financial stake in the business by doling out stock options, incentive bonuses or other rewards. But that’s not enough.
On the first page of John P. Kotter on What Leaders Really Do (Harvard Business School Press, 1999), the author declares that “most organizations today lack the leadership they need.” He then fills 170 pages with insights into how to solve this problem.
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