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Management Training

Management training isn’t just for newbies and novices – managers and supervisors of all levels and all ages need actionable management practices to bring to their department, division or company. Learn how to be the best boss you can be by expanding your management skills, managing change effectively and bring strong leadership into your everyday management practices.

One important way to judge your success as a manger is by the success of your employees. An effective manager isn’t just a boss who can extract the most productivity from his people, but the one who produces great future managers. How can you be sure that under your leadership managers will blossom?

Start your management training program here with our articles, tools, self-tests, and training sessions…

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What’s your reputation at work? Chances are, everyone in your office has a “rep.” The Chirpy One. The Sloppy Dresser. The Bad Breath Guy. Fairly or unfairly, we tend to label people in our minds—and those labels change the way we treat our co-workers.

In sharp contrast to optimistic forecasts that technology would rid your company of the “paper monster,” computers seem to have exacerbated the problem. Now, you’re sending, receiving and storing information electronically and printing copies—lots of copies. You may be able to live with the mess, but what will happen someday if you need to get your hands on one of those documents?

You want to make every hour count, so you plan your day in 15-minute chunks and prioritize your tasks. That’s smart time management, but it doesn’t guarantee you’ll work productively.

Lee Iacocca's book “Where have all the leaders gone?” came out in 2007, but his “Nine C’s of Leadership,” are more relevant today than ever. The former president of Ford and Chrysler warns leaders to tell the truth, even when painful. "When you spin, people stop listening."

A recent study says that 40% of managers are considered “bad bosses” by their employees. Yet most managers assume that their relationships with their employees are running smoothly. Obviously, some of those bosses are wrong … and that can create major problems for a business. Here are seven common employee complaints about management, plus ways managers can silence them.

Odds are your desk is a hub of organization. If that’s the case, you’re in the ideal position to create more value for your company by coaching others on ROO, or Return on Organization. Your task: Identify a few valuable tips, then share your expertise with others by offering a Lunch ‘n’ Learn on the topic, writing an article in the company newsletter or posting tips through e-mail.

Friction often exists between HR and supervisors because those front-line bosses don’t fully understand your HR role … and they may hold certain stereotypes about your department. Advice: Set the stage for HR-management collaboration with an “HR for managers” meeting. Explain how key HR functions practically benefit managers and their departments.
Deciding questions by data is to Google what global supply-chain management is to Walmart. Lesson: Let data work as an effective check against defending the status quo. It works for Google.
You may think you've just penned the most brilliant correspondence of the year, but if it takes the recipient too long to wade through lengthy paragraphs, he'll never know how bright you are. Let's face it: Fancy-schmancy business-speak does not make for strong business writing.
In an effort to “empower” their staffs, too many managers take a completely hands-off approach, leaving employees alone unless they really need help. But this can create a rudderless ship, says management expert Bruce Tulgan. That's not leadership! Here's how effective managers provide genuine support to their employees.
At HHA Services in St. Clair Shores, Mich., managers go all-out to reward high-performing employees with a fancy banquet at a local country club. In fact, they’ve never missed the chance to say thanks in 21 years, even during the recession.

Should you really have to say something twice to get someone to follow through? The most effective managers repeat themselves at least once, ­according to Harvard researchers. Some even send three or four redundant communications.

Deadbeats suck the life out of every­one around them. They may sometimes be hard to identify, and they’re even harder to publicly label once found. According to the blogger behind “HR Fish­bowl,” you’re a deadbeat employee if you:
Executives are struggling with time management now more than ever, given the “doing more with less” phi­­losophy that reigns in most workplaces. Ask your boss: “How can I open up more time in your schedule?"

Another admin on your team just made a cringe-worthy mistake. It was so bad that, although you’re a team player, you’d like to make sure your co-worker is held accountable. Is there a way to place the blame in a professional way? Opinions differ among the experts.

Administrative assistant Terri Vanias works for a company that’s feeling the pinch of a protracted recession. For the past couple of years, the company has had to trim the budget—and bonuses. Her company isn’t the only one finding ways to do more with less, even when it comes to recognizing and honoring employees:
Until now, courts have frequently concluded that a woman who is fired for undergoing fertility treatments—that is, fired before becoming pregnant—probably isn’t covered by the Pregnancy Dis­crimination Act. But now a court has concluded that women who undergo in vitro fertilization efforts are protected under the PDA. That’s because only women can undergo the process.

In tough economic times, people who lose their jobs often have to file for bankruptcy. But some employers frown on bankruptcy and don’t want to hire someone who can’t pay his or her bills. Now the 5th Circuit Court of Ap­­­­peals has ruled that a private employer is free to turn down an applicant because he or she filed for bankruptcy.

Michael DeMarquis worked for the Bexar County Office of the Constable for only five months, but between August and December 2009, he says he compiled an extensive list of illegal practices. Now he’s suing the law enforcement agency, claiming he was fired from his job as a warrant clerk in retaliation after he uncovered the following:

Employers generally must treat employees equally, including when they break the rules. But that doesn’t mean you have no disciplinary flexibility. The key: Explain why you think one employee deserves more serious punishment than another who committed the same infraction.
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