• LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google+

Leadership Skills

Don’t just be a boss — be a leader. Maximize your leadership skills in the five most crucial areas: decision making, executive coaching, leadership training, strategic management and understanding your leadership style.

Situational leadership changes depending on the type of leadership (direction and support) each of your employee’s needs. Emotional leadership is based more on the theory of emotional intelligences and relates to the situation at hand.
Access more articles, tools and advice on maximizing your leadership skills.

Page 9 of 62« First...7891011...203040...Last »
Revolutionary firebrand Ethan Allen was so charismatic that his guards on a British prison ship slipped him the captain’s leftover food and helped him adjust his leg irons (while guarding him, day and night, with fixed bayonets).
Many otherwise strong leaders have a glaring weakness: They buckle under pressure. To withstand pressure, you need to adopt the right attitude. Here are three keys to persevering when it counts.
“As a leader, you have to define your values in a strong, clear way... It’s important that everyone from the people in the billing department to senior executives is clear about the values-based principles that unite us.”
Q: I keep getting grief from my board for not developing my managers, but there are only so many priorities that I can address at once. How can I satisfy the board without dropping the ball on some other top priority?
Q. My boss told me I’m a weak manager—that I’m too humble, that I defer to others, dither rather than make quick, decisive decisions and I’m too eager to apologize. To me, that’s the kind of humility great leaders embody. Am I right?
Unfortunately, you’ve reached a point where you must fire an employee—who happens to be a friend. Follow this advice to ensure that you don’t make a bad situation even worse.
Clarity and leadership go together. Communicate clear directions and give your team the leeway to find ways to advance toward the goal.
It’s been a busy year for the word “Sorry.” We’ve seen the maddening, the middling and the almost there.
As a leader, what you say matters. So as you go about each day, facing challenges, guiding your people and meeting your performance goals, make sure you are using the following phrases.
For a leader, a public apology always involves risk. Here are some questions to help you walk the line between stonewalling and groveling.
In the days and hours leading up to your presentation, you may wallow in anxious thoughts such as, “I dread this” or “I hope I don’t look stupid.” Joey Asher, an Atlanta-based speech coach, calls this “selfish self-talk.”
Sundeep Bhandal let her father choose her husband. Since then, she has made a career of defying expectations.
Leading can be as simple as looking at where the numbers will take you. Get ahead of these trends now before others learn better than you how to profit and grow from them.
If you want to be seen as a leader, start communicating like one—even if you aren’t yet in a leadership position.
Although supervisors need a wide array of people skills and certain technical abilities, nothing is more critical to supervisory success than credibility. When supervisors lose their credibility, they lose both their employees’ trust and their effectiveness as leaders.
Everything we perceive is influenced by how we see ourselves. For this reason, we need to develop self-awareness—with no filters—to fulfill our potential as leaders.
Jamie Dimon prefers to share information—strategic initiatives, financial results, etc.—with a wide range of employees. Through this inclusive approach, people at all levels feel like participants in the company’s fortunes rather than bystanders.
Like any CEO, Amy Rees Anderson wishes that employees wouldn’t make costly errors. Yet she’s willing to look past well-intentioned mistakes as long as they turn into learning opportunities.
“I couldn’t understand why folks weren’t rowing with me. I thought, ‘I gave them all the data. It’s clear I’m right.’”
Many people with high standards lapse into perfectionism. They’re never happy with their work, so they keep investing more time trying to make it better. Carole King fought off perfectionism.
Page 9 of 62« First...7891011...203040...Last »