Leadership Skills: FREE Reports, tools, downloads and forms for Leaders & Managers — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Business Management Daily — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Page 57
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Leadership Skills

Don’t just be a boss — be a leader. Maximize your leadership skills in the five most crucial areas: decision making, executive coaching, leadership training, strategic management and understanding your leadership style.

Situational leadership changes depending on the type of leadership (direction and support) each of your employee’s needs. Emotional leadership is based more on the theory of emotional intelligences and relates to the situation at hand.
Access more articles, tools and advice on maximizing your leadership skills.

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Coping with the time demands of corporate culture
Preparing for a strategic planning meeting? Think SWOT: strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats.
Many business coaches are high-priced consultants. Save the money by turning your staffers into coaches.
It’s not easy straddling the line between disciplining employees and nurturing them.
Assess your team's ability to think strategically by answering these questions.
How to respond to several scenarios involving uncomfortable confrontations in the workplace
Here’s an easy way to tell if your résumé works for or against you. Look at the headings. Your “Qualifications” and “Accomplishments” sections should stand out. These are the two make-or-break elements.
Use budgeting to advance your corporate goals and motivate your employees.
Many middle managers top out because they lack the ability to think like a CEO. For author Constantinos C. Markides, the key to moving up is to develop your strategic thinking.
Q. I started a new job five months ago. It’s the first place I’ve worked where people routinely yell, scream and slam doors—it’s the corporate culture. I’m not used to this and I find it stressful. How can I cope?
Many companies have a policy of merely confirming an ex-employee’s dates of employment. Asking for opinions about performance may be fruitless
Men are stronger at business analysis and strategic planning and women are more results-driven, according to a recent study of North American managers.
As the boss, you figure some of your staff will covet your position. Maybe so. But it’s also surprisingly common for managers to envy an employee who possesses certain strengths or charisma that they lack.
When U.S. Commerce Secretary Ron Brown and some senior executives died in a plane crash a few years ago, I remember thinking, “Those CEOs better have good succession plans.”
Twenty years ago, few managers used the word “accountability.” Now it’s common knowledge that everyone must be held accountable to produce results.
Ever wonder why some managers create a harmonious, warm atmosphere while others operate in a snake pit?
The more authority you wield, the more you’ll have to fend off criticism from peers and subordinates. That’s the price of exercising power over others. But you can overcome that occupational hazard by shielding yourself from their verbal slings and arrows.
Until recent years, the first rule of smart hiring was, “Match the right skills with the right job.” But today’s managers know that attitude counts more than skill when they fill most job openings.
The authors of Semper Fi (Amacom, 1998) are convinced that managers can boost their leadership skills by borrowing tips from the Marine Corps.
Whenever you join a project team, vie for the role of spokesperson.
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