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Leadership Skills

Don’t just be a boss — be a leader. Maximize your leadership skills in the five most crucial areas: decision making, executive coaching, leadership training, strategic management and understanding your leadership style.

Situational leadership changes depending on the type of leadership (direction and support) each of your employee’s needs. Emotional leadership is based more on the theory of emotional intelligences and relates to the situation at hand.
Access more articles, tools and advice on maximizing your leadership skills.

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When he was 16, Frank Ntilikina asked Michael Jordan for the key to his success, and Jordan told the aspiring NBA player the most amazing thing he’d ever heard. 

Somewhere out there are true individuals who are just fine engaging in group or “significant other” activities all by themselves, completely comfortable no matter who’s looking at them quizzically. Become that type of person and you’ve reached a plateau of self-confidence few ever will.

Asked how he convinced his friend Warren Buffett to turn over most of his billions in an enormous donation to the Gates Foundation years ago, software pioneer Bill Gates said he never brought it up.

“I told them, ‘You’ve created a successful business after breaking away from another firm. I find that inspirational. I want that same story. And I can’t do this without your support.’”

When’s the last time you practiced treading water while a jug of water was poured onto your head?

To tackle your ever-expanding responsibilities, you create a to-do list. That’s a good start. The real test of your productivity, however, involves how you use your list.

A recent LinkedIn study surveyed 2,000 U.S. business-to-business professionals about how they see technology affecting sales. Here’s some data from the study, along with steps you can take.

Michael Houlihan didn’t intend to launch a wine company. It all started by happenstance.

Work-related disengagement and stress cost U.S. businesses hundreds of billions a year. As a leader, you need to model behavior that prevents disengagement and dissipates stress.

When Jennifer Cue left as CEO of Jones Soda Co. in 2006, she figured she could raise a family with the satisfaction of knowing she had positioned the beverage firm for years of steady growth. She was wrong.

As you mingle before delivering a speech, use that time to win over audience members. Help them form a positive first impression of you.

Deciding is a process, not an event, so use that process to learn. Here are some benefits, risks and challenges.
Q. I volunteered to serve on a committee to boost my visibility here. But I keep getting assigned time-consuming projects on top of my normal job. The projects aren’t very interesting, and it feels like the committee chair is just dumping chores on my lap. Should I quit this stupid committee?

Q. For years, I reported to the CEO. But the company brought in someone just below the CEO level, so now I report to this new manager who’s terrible. I rely on my new boss to get a sense of the CEO’s priorities, but after he comes out of meetings with the CEO, he’s vague about what’s next. Plus, he takes credit for my ideas. How would you handle this?

Give more information than your employees may need ... Keep chairs open ... Do a double evaluation

Serial entrepreneur Rohit Mehrotra owns one of the fastest-growing tech services companies in America. Asked what wisdom he would share with future leaders, aside from a strong ethical compass, he said this.
Before anyone had invented computers, two visionaries, John Mauchly and Presper Eckert, recognized their immense potential. They had to place a bet on the best way to get their imminent invention to market.
Your request for a favor should never assume that the request itself is a hassle. The way you ask is often the hassle.
Craig Ross was hired by a company to help its leaders innovate more effectively. Almost immediately, Ross detected a problem: The participants failed to connect well with each other.
Leaders who can take an organization from good to great are like Darwin Smith, the mild-mannered lawyer of Kimberly-Clark who, named CEO, transformed the stodgy old paper company. Smith embodies what is called Level 5 leadership: someone who combines extreme personal humility with intense professional will.
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