• LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google+

Leadership Skills

Don’t just be a boss — be a leader. Maximize your leadership skills in the five most crucial areas: decision making, executive coaching, leadership training, strategic management and understanding your leadership style.

Situational leadership changes depending on the type of leadership (direction and support) each of your employee’s needs. Emotional leadership is based more on the theory of emotional intelligences and relates to the situation at hand.
Access more articles, tools and advice on maximizing your leadership skills.

Page 32 of 62« First...1020...3031323334...405060...Last »
High school junior Jack Andraka was not satisfied at winning $100,000 in last year’s Intel science fair for developing a paper strip that might become the world’s best test for pancreatic cancer. With friends he’d made at the fair, the 16-year-old has set off on a new quest: the $10 million Tricorder X-Prize.
Are you a good leader? Are you a good teammate? Would your teammates evaluate you the same way you evaluate yourself? Are you sure? To find out, take this self-audit.

The number of virtual workers in the U.S. has grown by 800% in the past five years, according to the research-advisory firm Nemertes Research. This dramatic shift in the workforce presents challenges and opportunities for managers. Here are five tips for effectively managing out-of-office team members:

 

Though being a gregarious, social butterfly commonly helps leaders rise among the top ranks in their companies, there is plenty of opportunity for introverted personality types to shine, too. Here’s how.
All too often, leaders are blindsided because people on their team tell them what they want to hear rather than the truth about what’s going on.
Look ahead the Larry Page way ... Deliver a real statement to your people ... Have a career plan as strong as Campbell Soup's CEO.
Yale University researcher Marc Brackett and his team have identified five key skills—what he calls the RULER approach—that sharpen emotional intelligence.
Making a bad decision is bad enough. Just don’t dig yourself into a deeper hole. You’ll save time and headaches by avoiding what experts call “the escalation trap”—escalating your level of commitment to a lost cause.
After decades at the top, some executives lose their bearings and come across as imperious. When you’re compensated well to run a large organization, as Gordon Gee was, it’s even more important to watch what you say.
Aaron Jagdfeld runs a fast-growing company with $1 billion in annual ­revenue. He’s president and CEO of ­Generac Holdings, a maker of automatic standby generators based in Waukesha, Wis. Jagdfeld joined Generac in 1994 and became its chief executive in 2008, starting with a blank slate to shape the company's culture.

The first step to becoming a great manager is to acknowledge mistakes made along the way. By addressing those mistakes and changing your behavior, you enhance your managerial skills and build a stronger, more confident team. Here are 10 key mistakes that managers make.

Ever think you don’t deserve the success you’ve achieved in your career? According to Joyce Roché, author of The Empress Has No Clothes: Conquering Self-Doubt to Embrace Success, you might be suffering from impostor syndrome—the feeling that you’re a fraud and that others are more qualified.
When you open the floor to questions, you must still retain command of the proceedings. To engineer a crisp, informative Q&A, apply these techniques.
Like many senior executives, Donald Keough makes clear-cut decisions. But sometimes—as when he was president of The Coca-Cola Co. in 1989—his snap judgments have made him appear too bossy ...
Don't be greedy ... Keep it light ... Go fly a kite.
Q. Why do we frown on business leaders who truly command?
Advertising executive and TV personality Donny Deutsch sums up the secret of leadership in 10 words: You need to be comfortable enough not to be needed.
The best leaders listen well, deliver great speeches and show decisiveness when it counts. But that’s not all. Superior leaders demonstrate subtle skills that set them apart.
Michael Shermer, a contributor to Scientific American and founding publisher of Skeptic magazine, is deeply skeptical of a popular theory that wildly successful “outliers” are mainly the objects of good fortune.
Renoir’s pastel paintings of plump bourgeois people initially inspired rage, hatred and mockery. William Baker, director of a center for media education at Fordham, took away two lessons from that reaction.
Page 32 of 62« First...1020...3031323334...405060...Last »