Leadership Skills: FREE Reports, tools, downloads and forms for Leaders & Managers — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Business Management Daily — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Page 30
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Leadership Skills

Don’t just be a boss — be a leader. Maximize your leadership skills in the five most crucial areas: decision making, executive coaching, leadership training, strategic management and understanding your leadership style.

Situational leadership changes depending on the type of leadership (direction and support) each of your employee’s needs. Emotional leadership is based more on the theory of emotional intelligences and relates to the situation at hand.
Access more articles, tools and advice on maximizing your leadership skills.

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Sometimes, being a leader means being the only doctor in a town of 3,400 in rural Georgia. That’s how it is for Howard McMahan, M.D., who’s been seeing the same pa­­tients for more than 20 years, but for whom life would be easier if he closed his practice and took a job at a regional medical center 30 miles away. Still, he stays.
Exceptional leaders typically have no clue what their “genius” is. They can’t put their finger on what happens when they’re at their best.
A conversation with Brian Scudamore, 43, who founded 1-800-GOT-JUNK? in 1989. Today, it’s among the fastest-growing franchises in the world.
What can managers learn from watching the earnings of publicly traded companies? “Plenty,” says Kathleen Brush, a 25-year veteran of international business and author of The Power of One: You’re the Boss.
According to Business News Daily, a survey of employees showed they didn’t think their bosses were listening.
When former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher died earlier this year, the media burned up with opinions on the conservative icon. Two things not in doubt are that she was a bold leader and one of the 20th ­century’s heroes.
Ed “Jed” Barry had never been a banker before becoming CEO of a community bank in Maryland last year. Barry is notable for embracing aspects of leadership like vision and change.
R.A. Dickey’s career was failing. A pitcher in the major leagues, he struggled on the mound. To compensate for a ligament problem in his pitching arm, he was in the midst of reinventing his pitching style. Not only did he reinvent his pitch, he made it something unique—the knuckleball.
Focus is essential for reaching big goals. Here are several tried-and-true ways to limit distractions and narrow your focus so you can get the most important work done.
Learn to take those first steps toward leadership alone ... Take Derek Jeter's advice on being bold ... Provide nuance where it's becoming desperately needed.
Most business presenters overlook voice tempo. They don’t modulate their speed and wind up missing a golden opportunity to enhance the dynamism of their remarks.
Baseball hit bottom in 1976, and Mark Fidrych hit the top. For one season, and especially for one night, the 21-year-old rookie with the Detroit Tigers led the country’s fans back to baseball.
A leader’s most important job is making good decisions. Step back and improve yours: Consider several options, think objectively, be fair and curb your enthusiasm.
The term “servant leader” applies to executives who lack huge egos. They win allegiance by positioning themselves as supportive allies, not bossy tyrants. Servant leaders exhibit six traits:

Joe Coulombe still has his fingerprints all over Trader Joe’s. Founder of the food store that bears his name, Coulombe is responsible for the good selection of dried fruits and nuts, as well as the Hawaiian shirts employees wear. Other trademarks are less visible.

How would you make enemy soldiers think they were outnumbered? Col. Pete Blaber and his team came up with this fake-out in 2001.
If you’re in the 60+ age range and considering retirement soon, you may want to reconsider, says Charles W.B. Wardell III, president and CEO of executive search firm Witt/Kieffer. According to Wardell, profes­sionals age 65 and older are now aggressively sought by savvy com­panies for leadership and mentorship roles.
How did a young man from Cocoa Beach, Fla.—a place not known as a surfing haven—become the greatest surfer of all time? Luck? No, unbelievable drive and determination.
New leaders often assume they must make a big splash from the outset. So on their first day, they enact dramatic changes or issue bold announcements. Levelheaded leaders, by contrast, resist the urge to rush.
Strong leaders muscle their way forward. But strength alone isn’t enough. You need to know when to push and when to pull to win over followers. Here’s how.
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