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Leadership Skills

Don’t just be a boss — be a leader. Maximize your leadership skills in the five most crucial areas: decision making, executive coaching, leadership training, strategic management and understanding your leadership style.

Situational leadership changes depending on the type of leadership (direction and support) each of your employee’s needs. Emotional leadership is based more on the theory of emotional intelligences and relates to the situation at hand.
Access more articles, tools and advice on maximizing your leadership skills.

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Sweat it like the co-founder of ZipCar ... Imagine it like a Nobel Prize winner ... Say bye-bye to spam.
Brent Peterson learned a sad lesson at a food truck. One day, he only had $5. He figured that wouldn’t be enough for Indian cuisine, so he was ready to keep walking when the food truck’s proprietor stopped him ...
Many leaders pride themselves on their ability to listen. But to listen well, you must do more than concentrate on what you hear: You need to ask smart questions. Follow these steps to ex­­tract more information through probing.

Arthur Ochs “Punch” Sulzberger, former publisher of The New York Times who died in 2012, had not been an obvious choice as leader. Mild-mannered, introverted and modest, Sulzberger remained modest even after great success in the family business.

Chuck Yeager turned 90 in February but refuses to slow down. “While I’m not gonna run no marathon, I still hunt and fish and fly,” says the guy who broke the speed of sound with a rocket plane in 1947.
In 1986, Richard Manoogian was CEO of Masco, a maker of faucets and household products that had produced 29 straight years of earnings growth. The firm was generating nearly $2 billion in cash—and Manoogian decided to invest a big chunk of it in the furniture business. Manoogian called it “probably one of the worst decisions I’ve made in 35 years.”
You can trumpet your organization’s core values and unshakable ethics. But your actions will influence what em­­ployees think far more than your words.
To bring cultures together, identify differences in attitudes and work habits. Then address the differences so that everyone gains a better understanding of their colleagues’ perspectives. Skip this step and conflicts can erupt. This occurred after Daimler-Benz acquired Chrysler in 1998.
You’ve probably been watching global finances with a wary eye, waiting and wondering if it’s all going to blow up. But it’s not under your control.
Whether you feel like a “born leader” or a thinly veiled fraud, you can develop valuable insights by quizzing yourself on your skills, traits and experience as a leader. On each of these items, give yourself an “S” for strong or “N” for needs improvement.
Run down this list to see if your behavior aligns with the “high influence style” of leadership.
Leaders need to project the kind of confidence that can start a conversation instead of shutting it down, so they should aim to be more like Oprah Winfrey than Martha Stewart.
Here are some ways to use time more wisely: 1. Stop trying to do everything ... 2. Stay on message ... 3. Don’t let routine matters usurp important ones ...
“It’s human nature to value the attributes of others that are the most similar to our own and devalue the characteristics that we do not possess,” says Peter Friedes, co-founder of Managing People Better. But you can pay a price for shortsightedness.
For generations, Procter & Gamble innovated from within. The giant consumer products company that makes Tide detergent and Crest toothpaste conducted research-and-development veiled in secrecy. Under A.J. Lafley, P&G’s now-retired CEO, the company’s closed innovation process began to open up.

New leaders have expanded from “country-centric” to global in outlook. They have to be smart, says former Medtronic CEO William George, but now they have to be culturally and emotionally intelligent, too.

Tweet this (or not) ... Make the commitment to be there ... Think big ...
A manager who is able to recognize symptoms of a demoralized staff can take action to improve the situation.
How things go during a new employee’s first days and weeks on the job can make the difference between a great hire and a disastrous one.
Just as Beethoven inserted powerful moments of silence in his symphonies, Abraham Lincoln imposed large periods of silence on his road to leadership.
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