Leadership Skills: FREE Reports, tools, downloads and forms for Leaders & Managers — Page 3
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Leadership Skills

Don’t just be a boss — be a leader. Maximize your leadership skills in the five most crucial areas: decision making, executive coaching, leadership training, strategic management and understanding your leadership style.

Situational leadership changes depending on the type of leadership (direction and support) each of your employee’s needs. Emotional leadership is based more on the theory of emotional intelligences and relates to the situation at hand.
Access more articles, tools and advice on maximizing your leadership skills.

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Q. For years, I reported to the CEO. But the company brought in someone just below the CEO level, so now I report to this new manager who’s terrible. I rely on my new boss to get a sense of the CEO’s priorities, but after he comes out of meetings with the CEO, he’s vague about what’s next. Plus, he takes credit for my ideas. How would you handle this?

Give more information than your employees may need ... Keep chairs open ... Do a double evaluation

Serial entrepreneur Rohit Mehrotra owns one of the fastest-growing tech services companies in America. Asked what wisdom he would share with future leaders, aside from a strong ethical compass, he said this.
Before anyone had invented computers, two visionaries, John Mauchly and Presper Eckert, recognized their immense potential. They had to place a bet on the best way to get their imminent invention to market.
Your request for a favor should never assume that the request itself is a hassle. The way you ask is often the hassle.
Craig Ross was hired by a company to help its leaders innovate more effectively. Almost immediately, Ross detected a problem: The participants failed to connect well with each other.
Leaders who can take an organization from good to great are like Darwin Smith, the mild-mannered lawyer of Kimberly-Clark who, named CEO, transformed the stodgy old paper company. Smith embodies what is called Level 5 leadership: someone who combines extreme personal humility with intense professional will.
Want to earn a big promotion? Start acting like you’ve already received it.
Career climbers hitch their wagon to a star, right? Not necessarily. While it’s smart to forge alliances with a handful of influential leaders across your organization, leaning too heavily on them can backfire.
James Patterson, the world’s highest-paid and possibly most prolific author, describes the best advice he ever received.
Jim McIngvale, known as “Mattress Mack,” turned his two Houston furniture stores into shelters after Hurricane Harvey. The social media was tremendous.
Nothing stops you from developing your leadership skills, even if you have no one under you to lead. By exerting influence and making an impact, you can lead without an army of underlings reporting to you.
During the Olympics, athletes often engage in private rituals just before a race. Whether they’re repeating an uplifting mantra or visualizing victory, these pre-performance routines help them gain an edge. Follow their lead when facing any high-stakes challenge.
Jeffrey Citron likes to work in disruptive technologies, and boy, did he ever pick a couple: securities and phones.
One feature of good leadership is that only the intractable problems come to you. As long as you don’t micromanage, you should only be asked to solve problems your people can’t solve themselves.
Esther Hobart Morris, a settler in the gold rush town of South Pass City, Wyo., became the first woman in America to serve as a justice of the peace in 1870, mere months after Wyoming allowed women to vote in 1869 and a half century before all U.S. women won the right to vote.
Ed Clark, the longtime leader of TD Bank Group, a Canada-based financial giant, spent his career challenging the image of the loud, take-charge CEO.
Asked to describe the most important leadership skill, here’s what Twitter followers tweeted back.
“I became a stronger leader by having experienced tragedy. You grieve, you provide reassurance to your team and you get through it.”
Soon after Philip Krim co-founded his company, Casper, success turned to stress. But rather than panic, he’s engaging in open, honest communication with his 300 employees—and the public.
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