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Leadership Skills

Don’t just be a boss — be a leader. Maximize your leadership skills in the five most crucial areas: decision making, executive coaching, leadership training, strategic management and understanding your leadership style.

Situational leadership changes depending on the type of leadership (direction and support) each of your employee’s needs. Emotional leadership is based more on the theory of emotional intelligences and relates to the situation at hand.
Access more articles, tools and advice on maximizing your leadership skills.

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Managers are sometimes tempted to quit planning because (1) time is so limited, (2) their bosses call all the shots, or (3) goals and priorities change so often that plans are no longer applicable. Those sound like good reasons not to plan, but here’s how planning helps a manager be the best he or she can be.

If you’re a business leader, keep an eye on @JohnLegere and other leaders who have chosen to risk backlash by speaking bluntly on social media and putting their faces and words front and center of the company’s public persona.

Andrew Makar is all too familiar with project management challenges. An information technology consultant, he has learned how to avoid potholes and stay on track.

Q: Our CEO is always telling us to be more open about our failures. He wants us to innovate, and he knows that means some botched experiments. But the few of us who have taken high-profile risks have not been lauded; in fact, he’s privately (and publicly) shamed and embarrassed us. Is there a polite way to call someone a hypocrite?

When he was 16, Frank Ntilikina asked Michael Jordan for the key to his success, and Jordan told the aspiring NBA player the most amazing thing he’d ever heard. 

Somewhere out there are true individuals who are just fine engaging in group or “significant other” activities all by themselves, completely comfortable no matter who’s looking at them quizzically. Become that type of person and you’ve reached a plateau of self-confidence few ever will.

Asked how he convinced his friend Warren Buffett to turn over most of his billions in an enormous donation to the Gates Foundation years ago, software pioneer Bill Gates said he never brought it up.

“I told them, ‘You’ve created a successful business after breaking away from another firm. I find that inspirational. I want that same story. And I can’t do this without your support.’”

When’s the last time you practiced treading water while a jug of water was poured onto your head?

To tackle your ever-expanding responsibilities, you create a to-do list. That’s a good start. The real test of your productivity, however, involves how you use your list.

A recent LinkedIn study surveyed 2,000 U.S. business-to-business professionals about how they see technology affecting sales. Here’s some data from the study, along with steps you can take.

Michael Houlihan didn’t intend to launch a wine company. It all started by happenstance.

Work-related disengagement and stress cost U.S. businesses hundreds of billions a year. As a leader, you need to model behavior that prevents disengagement and dissipates stress.

When Jennifer Cue left as CEO of Jones Soda Co. in 2006, she figured she could raise a family with the satisfaction of knowing she had positioned the beverage firm for years of steady growth. She was wrong.

As you mingle before delivering a speech, use that time to win over audience members. Help them form a positive first impression of you.

Deciding is a process, not an event, so use that process to learn. Here are some benefits, risks and challenges.
Q. I volunteered to serve on a committee to boost my visibility here. But I keep getting assigned time-consuming projects on top of my normal job. The projects aren’t very interesting, and it feels like the committee chair is just dumping chores on my lap. Should I quit this stupid committee?

Q. For years, I reported to the CEO. But the company brought in someone just below the CEO level, so now I report to this new manager who’s terrible. I rely on my new boss to get a sense of the CEO’s priorities, but after he comes out of meetings with the CEO, he’s vague about what’s next. Plus, he takes credit for my ideas. How would you handle this?

Give more information than your employees may need ... Keep chairs open ... Do a double evaluation

Serial entrepreneur Rohit Mehrotra owns one of the fastest-growing tech services companies in America. Asked what wisdom he would share with future leaders, aside from a strong ethical compass, he said this.
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