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Leadership Skills

Don’t just be a boss — be a leader. Maximize your leadership skills in the five most crucial areas: decision making, executive coaching, leadership training, strategic management and understanding your leadership style.

Situational leadership changes depending on the type of leadership (direction and support) each of your employee’s needs. Emotional leadership is based more on the theory of emotional intelligences and relates to the situation at hand.
Access more articles, tools and advice on maximizing your leadership skills.

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Known for fairness and firmness, Joseph Wapner was TV’s first judge, star of “The People’s Court” from 1981 to 1993.
Quality, innovation, profitability, and growth all depend on having strategy and execution fit together seamlessly.
The most enlightened leaders deal with problem personalities just like everyone else. But it’s the way they respond to difficult or unlikable people that sets them apart.
Some people thought A. Philip Randolph was crazy in 1930 when he turned down a job offer from New York City’s mayor, Fiorello La Guardia.
Frank Sesno’s favorite question to ask a leader is simply, “How do you know?”
As founder and CEO of a chain of sushi restaurants in Florida, Abe Ng attributes his success to two factors: setting high standards and communicating a clear vision to employees.
One of the foibles of many managers—especially the rookies—is the lack of assertiveness. It’s the awareness of the need to swoop down on wayward employees to express your opinions and feelings without delay.
Most change efforts—70% in fact—fail, usually because of botched communication.
Seeking to reduce employee injuries, Paul Anderson sought ideas from his top safety official who declared, “It’s your fault.”
Holding onto anger can eat away at your well-being. Even if someone upsets you, choose how to respond. And remember that time is a master healer.
You may never have heard of Terry Winograd, but the Stanford professor emeritus has mentored two of the greatest tech luminaries of our age: Google co-founder Larry Page and LinkedIn founder Reid Hoffman.
“Every morning, I’d walk in the front door and think, ‘Do I really want to do this?’”
Ethical lapses don’t occur in a vacuum. Usually, faulty assumptions or actions contribute to bad outcomes.
In 1997, Jeff Bezos spoke to a Harvard Business School class about his fledgling e-commerce company. They urged him to sell his startup to Barnes & Noble.
Without trust and mutual respect, less sharing of information and more obfuscation can lead to tragically wrongheaded decisions.
Q. I just accepted a midlevel manager job. Yesterday, I met with a senior vice president who I’ll have to work with regularly. He said, “I don’t suffer fools gladly.” I interpreted that as arrogant, especially given his pompous tone. How do you cope with fools like this?
Q. My boss refuses to let me run an internal training program. He insists on wasting money on an outside consultant because he thinks this “expert” knows more than I do. I’m furious. Any advice on what I should do next?
Golf legend Arnold Palmer recalled half a dozen close rounds and playoffs in the 1960s and 1970s he could have won if he’d kept the killer instinct that won him the U.S. Open at Cherry Hills in 1960.
“It’s important to question your own assumptions before you try to communicate a message to others.”
Kate Brodock, co-founder and CEO of Women 2.0, has learned a few lessons she’d like to pass on.
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