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Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

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Even if people are not as rational as we’d hope, there are steps we can take to mitigate our biases. 

Almost all business leaders, even loners, recognize the benefits of collaboration. They realize that the best ideas come from group input, both inside and outside the organization. It took Procter & Gamble a long time to see the light. 

The national conversation on sexual harassment must include strategies for creating workplaces in which such actions never occur. Consider these ideas experts support as to how managers can build better environments.

7 tools to check out.

At work, numbers speak volumes. If you can’t show, quantitatively, that something is improving, then how can you really know it’s improving? It’s not surprising, then, that more admins are being asked to set SMART goals to be evaluated against.

Don't let go of that runner-up just yet ... Are you oversimplifying things?

Innovation sputters when fear runs rampant. Managers may hype the importance of taking risks, only to chastise those who embark on bold but costly experiments.

Understand that our knowledge of disruptive technology is not really about what’s going to happen in the future. It’s happening now.

Leaders step up in a crisis. Their calm, sturdy attitude boosts everyone’s spirits as they lurch toward a solution. To maintain grace under pressure, start by framing the situation clearly. Explain the crisis to employees in simple terms.

Think emojis aren’t very important in the grand scheme of things? Consider Jessica Morrison’s view of them. She’s editor of Chemical and Engineering News and co-author of a plan to introduce nine new science-themed emojis to the existing 1300 Unicode-approved characters we all know better day after day.

Minnesota Twins manager Ron Gardenhire’s willingness to admit error shows that fallibility and leadership go hand-in-hand.

Ryan Cohen and his business partner decided to sell their jewelry inventory at a loss to try to corner the market on pet parents. The result was Chewy.com. Silicon Valley wasn’t that interested in parting with startup money at first, but the company is now valued at around $4 billion.

A recent spate of trouble for high-profile startups may have the business world rethinking Silicon Valley’s magic.
Q: When we’re up against a crunch deadline, our CEO tries to bolster our confidence by giving us a T-shirt with “YGT” on it. It stands for “You Got This.” I don’t need to be told I can tackle a tough challenge. I do need better support—more resources, more time, more cooperation from the CEO. Can I rip up my shirt?
“The whole is better than the sum of its parts.” Aristotle said this an eon ago and it still holds true today. This is particularly important when putting together a high-functioning leadership team.
Q. I work closely with the owner of a consulting firm. He’ll only let people ask a question, not explain what’s going on. He says that’s just his personality (he says he’s a “D” and an “I”) and his style is normal for his personality type. It’s driving me crazy. What good is it to have me here if I can’t provide information on the status of projects or situations?
Now that we live in an age of trolls, every leader needs to handle insults. It’s something Apple’s Steve Jobs demonstrated 20 years ago.
No matter how emotionally intelligent we think we are, situations will test us. Try to put these tips into practice when your anger mounts.
Four years into the job, the CEO of a chain of day care centers had revitalized the company’s finances, but his verbal gaffes threatened to drive away customers and staff.
Take this quiz to see how transparent you are as a leader.
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