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Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

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Think emojis aren’t very important in the grand scheme of things? Consider Jessica Morrison’s view of them. She’s editor of Chemical and Engineering News and co-author of a plan to introduce nine new science-themed emojis to the existing 1300 Unicode-approved characters we all know better day after day.

Minnesota Twins manager Ron Gardenhire’s willingness to admit error shows that fallibility and leadership go hand-in-hand.

Ryan Cohen and his business partner decided to sell their jewelry inventory at a loss to try to corner the market on pet parents. The result was Chewy.com. Silicon Valley wasn’t that interested in parting with startup money at first, but the company is now valued at around $4 billion.

A recent spate of trouble for high-profile startups may have the business world rethinking Silicon Valley’s magic.
Q: When we’re up against a crunch deadline, our CEO tries to bolster our confidence by giving us a T-shirt with “YGT” on it. It stands for “You Got This.” I don’t need to be told I can tackle a tough challenge. I do need better support—more resources, more time, more cooperation from the CEO. Can I rip up my shirt?
“The whole is better than the sum of its parts.” Aristotle said this an eon ago and it still holds true today. This is particularly important when putting together a high-functioning leadership team.
Q. I work closely with the owner of a consulting firm. He’ll only let people ask a question, not explain what’s going on. He says that’s just his personality (he says he’s a “D” and an “I”) and his style is normal for his personality type. It’s driving me crazy. What good is it to have me here if I can’t provide information on the status of projects or situations?
Now that we live in an age of trolls, every leader needs to handle insults. It’s something Apple’s Steve Jobs demonstrated 20 years ago.
No matter how emotionally intelligent we think we are, situations will test us. Try to put these tips into practice when your anger mounts.
Different employees crave different things from their managers. Here’s practical advice you can give the bosses in your organization. You’ll help them focus on the managerial qualities that matter most to employees—and forget about the window dressing workers don’t care about.
Four years into the job, the CEO of a chain of day care centers had revitalized the company’s finances, but his verbal gaffes threatened to drive away customers and staff.
Take this quiz to see how transparent you are as a leader.
Maryam Mirzakhani’s work on complex curved surfaces was deeply theoretical, boldly original and of untold future importance.
The highlight of engineering firm Burns & McDonnell’s Principals Day is when the CEO presents a specific business problem to the 120-year-old company’s top employees and gives them one hour to come up with five potential solutions.
In February 1985, Ida Cole joined Microsoft as one of its first female vice presidents. Within months, her relationship with the mercurial Bill Gates worsened. His confrontational style created a tense workplace.
Your days are indeed dotted with small promises and commitments to your employees: from "I'll stop by this afternoon to give you a hand" to "drop by my office later and we'll talk about that." Here are some tips on how to keep your word.
Q. I’ve been a midmanager here for 10 years. Recently, I got a new boss who’s decades younger than me, and I’m suddenly an outcast. I’ve been treated terribly by this person, even though I’ve been supportive and made his job easier. When I asked what gives, he said, “You have to prove your relevance to me.” Outrageous!
Given the “anything goes” times we’re living in where people share far too much online, here is your annual reminder of things you should not discuss at work.
Most of us wait to end our time at a job, or our careers, until we absolutely must go. But once in a while, it’s worth imagining what it would be like to depart in midstride.
In the late 1800s, the U.S. Department of Agriculture under James Wilson was setting up scientific research stations all over the country. George Washington Carver put in a bid for a black research station.
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