Best-Practices Leadership: FREE reports, tools, downloads and forms for Leaders & Managers! — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Business Management Daily — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Page 125
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Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

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If your résumé is a bit mossy, it may be because you’re not quite the rolling stone you once were … and you’re ready for a big move up. That means you’ll need a new résumé not just an update with two-line bullet points. Here’s how to draw up an executive- level résumé:
The award-winning Orpheus Chamber Orchestra performs without a conductor, which seems like an argument against hierarchical leadership. But let’s examine some pros and cons.
This psychological test of small business chiefs, called the Test of Attentional and Interpersonal Style (TAIS), also works with big corporations, the military and Olympic athletes. See how you compare:
Heed AFLAC CEO Daniel Amos, who credits his success to a very simple philosophy:
Myron Jones, the president of NMB Technologies, a manufacturer of precision mechanical and electrical components, uses these three “bones” as his tests of leadership:
If your managers completely control hiring and firing, and you’d like to explore a less hierarchical system, consider adding peer reviews. Take the U.S. Army’s Ranger school, as described by Kelly Perdew, one of only about a third of candidates who earn a Ranger tab on their first 67-day battle with the wilderness.
A recent McKinsey study of the world’s most profitable megacorporations finds that their achievements are made possible by some shared leadership outlooks and practices.
Professional football teams are fairly evenly matched. What makes the difference between winners and losers is leadership. John C. Maxwell calls it the Law of the Edge, and it’s pretty powerful stuff.
Leaders see opportunity in every adversity. The cure may well outlast the disease.
Like Gideon in biblical times and Coretta Scott King in our own, actor Michael J. Fox wasn’t exactly thrilled about his call to leadership. Famous for playing boyish roles in Back to the Future movies and the TV show Family Ties, Fox never would have begun championing research on Parkinson’s disease if he hadn’t been diagnosed with it himself at age 30.
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